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Last 5 Posts:
· Re: ???Pinyon Jay(s)??? at Grassy Hollow Visitor Center??? (Jun 19, 2018)
· ???Pinyon Jay(s)??? at Grassy Hollow Visitor Center??? (Jun 18, 2018)
· Pigeon Guillemots off Point Dume (Jun 17, 2018)
· Los Angeles RBA- 15 June 2018 (Jun 15, 2018)
· PAS Pelagic September 15th (Jun 15, 2018)
  1. Re: ???Pinyon Jay(s)??? at Grassy Hollow Visitor Center??? LINK
    DATE: Jun 19, 2018 @ 8:58am, 2 day(s) ago
    I got an email from a friend suggesting White-breasted Nuthatch (which did occur to me when I was there, so while there, I listened to calls of various nuthatch species on my phone's Sibley app; none of them matched)
    . However, the phone apps don't have all the calls, so I just spent a good half an hour listening to nuthatches and Pinyon Jays on
    
    www.xeno-canto.org and keep circling back to Pinyon Jay. The calls I heard are labeled "begging calls" by the recordists who uploaded them. Unlike the typical nasal"Weh! Weh! Weh! Weh! Weh!" calls that are on Peterson bird sound CDs, the Sibley app, etc., these calls could be described as a smooth, round "Hop!" Tom Miko Claremont 909.241.3300
    
    From: Thomas Miko
    
    Sent: Monday, June 18, 2018 8:36:59 PM
    
    To: LA Co Birds
    
    Subject:Pinyon Jay(s) at Grassy Hollow Visitor Center 
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  3. ???Pinyon Jay(s)??? at Grassy Hollow Visitor Center??? LINK
    DATE: Jun 18, 2018 @ 8:36pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Hi Did I put enough question marks into the subject line Yesterday, after she handed me a 14year oldbottle of Oban, she asked, "What do you want to do for Father's Day" so I said that I wanted to go up Highway 2 and look for mountain birds. At Grassy Hollow I heard
    a fascinating sound 4 different times over the course of an hour. I had sound recording equipment, and did record Fox Sparrows and Green-tailed Towhees, but never succeeded in capturing the sound of this/these birds that called out of sight. The Clark's Nutcrackers
    also called, sight unseen, so there was a lot of "heard only" going on, yesterday. I am quite familiar with the sound of Pinyon Jays from the eastern Big Bear area, and other mountain ranges in California. I have heard them many times. Is there anything else up there e.g. WB Nuthatch/White-headed Woodpecker that sounds similar to Pinyon Jay Not just vaguely similar, but close enough, that I got that other bird species calls confused with Pinyon
    Jay Weather: it was beautiful up there, with blue skies, but surprisingly cool or cold. Very mild breeze.
    Tom Miko Claremont 909.241.3300
    PS: Paul, we never made it to Blue Ridge Campground: we slowly meandered eastward on the 2, and missed Red Crossbill, etc. PPS: Lance, you were right: you can upload WAV files into eBird reports, but you cannot upload them from a cell phone. I emailed myself the WAV files off my phone, yesterday, and uploaded them effortlessly into
    eBird from a Windows 7 laptop. Interesting that I can upload MP3 files into eBird from my cell phone, but not WAV files. Like Spock always says, "Fascinating."
    
    Parenthood is a competition between two people where the man always wins the bronze. Alec Baldwin April 16, 2017
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  5. Pigeon Guillemots off Point Dume LINK
    DATE: Jun 17, 2018 @ 4:05pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Birders, A very slow sea-watching morning at Point Dume was partially salvaged when two alternate-plumaged Pigeon Guillemots flew past well offshore heading west around 9:45. This species is rare but regular along our coast in early summer, especially around rocky
    headlands. Otherwise, about 300 very distant Sooty Shearwaters, one (somewhat closer) Black-vented Shearwater, and a single very worn Northern Fulmar were the only tubenoses, and there wereno other alcids.At least two Black Oystercatchers were in the rocky
    intertidal at low tide. I've had someproductive sea-watching days from the point in June in the past, but today was not one of them. Kimball Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology 
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  7. Los Angeles RBA- 15 June 2018 LINK
    DATE: Jun 15, 2018 @ 3:22pm, 6 day(s) ago
    - RBA * California * Los Angeles RBA *June 15, 2018 * CALA1806.15 -Birds mentioned Chimney Swift MASKED BOOBY Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Glaucous-winged Gull Vermilion Flycatcher Summer Tanager Indigo Bunting
    California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate on the rare bird report form):http://www.californiabirds.org/ Enter your bird sightings on eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher atJonF60@... Coverage: Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted -Transcript This is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for June 15. A CHIMNEY SWIFT was just east of Castaic Lake on June 9. A probable MASKED BOOBY was at the southeast end of Santa Catalina Island on June 11.
    There is some possibility that this bird is a MASKED/NAZCA BOOBY. A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was still at the Ballona Freshwater Marsh near Playa Vista through June 9.
    The marsh is at the corner of Lincoln and Jefferson. A GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL continued at Lake Balboa in the San Fernando Valley through June 8. A VERMILION FLYCATCHER was along the Playa Vista Riparian Corridor below Loyola Marymount University on June 9. Four more VERMILION FLYCATCHERS continued along the east edge of the Castaic Sports Complex through June 6. An immature male SUMMER TANAGER was at St. Andrew's Priory near Valyermo on June 9.
    Another SUMMER TANAGER was at Madrona Marsh in Torrance on June 9. An INDIGO BUNTING was on San Clemente Island from June 5-6. - end transcript Jon L Fisher Glendale, CA JonF60@... EVENTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS For all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website athttp://www.laaudubon.org
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  9. PAS Pelagic September 15th LINK
    DATE: Jun 15, 2018 @ 11:28am, 6 day(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    There are a handful of tickets still available to purchase for Pasadena Audubon's 2018 eight hour dedicated pelagic trip. We will depart from Dana Point on the Sea Explorer and spend as much time as possible in Los Angeles County waters. Birds that might be encountered include a variety of shearwaters, jaegers, phalaropes, alcids, gulls and terns. One of our main targets will be the rafts of storm-petrels that gather offshore in September, which may include both Black and Least.
    
    Last year we managed a sweep of jaegers, Sabine's Gulls as well as killer views of Craveri's Murrelet. Rarities seen at this time of year in these waters have included Manx and Flesh-footed Shearwater, Arctic Tern, Red-footed and Blue-footed Booby among others. Tickets a re available for purchase from the PAS Website for $67.00 http://www.pasadenaaudubon.org/q=pelagic2018
    
    Luke Tiller, Altadena
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  11. Valyermo Summer Tanager LINK
    DATE: Jun 9, 2018 @ 6:24pm, 12 day(s) ago
    All-
    
    On my way back from E. Kern today I swung by St. Andrews Priory in Valyermo and had a singing SUMMER TANAGER. photos here:
    
    https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46430333
    
    Ryan
    
    Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
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  13. Los Angeles RBA- 8 June 2018 LINK
    DATE: Jun 8, 2018 @ 3:14pm, 13 day(s) ago
    - RBA * California * Los Angeles RBA *June 8, 2018 * CALA1806.08 -Birds mentioned Common Merganser Chimney Swift Whimbrel Dunlin Eastern Kingbird Purple Martin Varied Thrush Baltimore Oriole American Redstart Northern Parula Rose-breasted Grosbeak California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate on the rare bird report form):http://www.californiabirds.org/ Enter your bird sightings on eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher atJonF60@... Coverage: Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted -Transcript This is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for June 8. Late or potentially summering COMMON MERGANSERS were at Quail Lake on June 2 and at the Rowena Reservoir in Los Feliz on June 3. A CHIMNEY SWIFT was reported at El Dorado Park in Long Beach on June 2. An EASTERN KINGBIRD continued at the Piute Ponds on Edwards AFB through June 1 near Friends Pond.
    A WHIMBREL was nearby at Duckbill Lake on June 1 and a DUNLIN was present on June 7.
    Remember that a letter of permission is required for entry. A PURPLE MARTIN was at Victoria Park in Carson on June 2. A late VARIED THRUSH was at the Sepulveda Basin on June 2 by the restrooms northeast of the wildlife area north entrance. An apparent immature male BALTIMORE ORIOLE was along the Playa Vista Riparian Corridor on June 1.
    The bird was on the slope below the northeast corner of Loyola Marymount University. A ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK was at a residence in Claremont on June 6. San Clemente Island produced a BALTIMORE ORIOLE present from June 1-2, a ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK on June 2 and a CHIMNEY SWIFT, an AMERICAN REDSTART and a NORTHERN PARULA on June 4. - end transcript Jon L Fisher Glendale, CA JonF60@... EVENTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS For all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website athttp://www.laaudubon.org
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  15. the Inca Dove continues at Col. Washington Park (South L.A.) LINK
    DATE: Jun 5, 2018 @ 5:15pm, 16 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Tues 5 June
    
    Mid morning today at Washington Park the Inca Dove was on a wire along Maie Ave, across from the small maintenance yard north of 91st Street. It then flew to a tree at the corner of 90th.
    
    (Up to 7 Incas were originally being reported at the park in February 2014. Now over the past eleven months or so, only one remaining bird has been seen.)
    
    Photos from this morning:
    
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/42603149461
    
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/41702480845
    
    Richard Barth
    
    West Hollywood
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  17. Varied Thrush at Sepulveda Basin, 06/02/18. LINK
    DATE: Jun 2, 2018 @ 5:02pm, 19 day(s) ago
    Hello,
    
    The Varied Thrush that was found by Daniel Tinoco this morning at Sepulveda Basin continues as of 4:45pm (Saturday, 06/02/18). It is currently moving about the grassy area by the restrooms that are by the amphitheater..
    
    Good Birding,
    
    Chezy Yusuf
    
    Torrance, CA.
    
    Sent from my iPhone
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  19. Peregrine in El Segundo LINK
    DATE: Jun 2, 2018 @ 7:11pm, 19 day(s) ago
    Hello,
    Today, Saturday (June 02), in the afternoon, I photographed a Peregrine Falcon actively harassing Doves at Clutter's Park (LAX overlook) at East Imperial Avenue and Sheldon Street intersection in El Segundo.
    Here's the link to my photo: https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/photo/116869188863835438571/6562673358106869922hl=en-US
    I also went to Playa del Rey earlier in the morning but didn't see anything interesting out there.
    
    Good birding, Alexander Viduetsky Valley Village, CA
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  21. Los Angeles RBA- 1 June 2018 LINK
    DATE: Jun 1, 2018 @ 2:45pm, 20 day(s) ago
    - RBA * California * Los Angeles RBA *June 1, 2018 * CALA1806.01 -Birds mentioned Common Merganser Chimney Swift Arctic Tern Vermilion Flycatcher Dusky-capped Flycatcher Tropical Kingbird Eastern Kingbird Purple Martin Baltimore Oriole Black-and-white Warbler American Redstart Hepatic Tanager Summer Tanager Rose-breasted Grosbeak California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate on the rare bird report form):http://www.californiabirds.org/ Enter your bird sightings on eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher atJonF60@... Coverage: Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted -Transcript This is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for June 1. Five COMMON MERGANSERS were at Castaic Lake on May 28. A CHIMNEY SWIFT was seen along the LA River just above the Los Feliz crossing in Glendale/Atwater Village through May 26.
    Park in the golf course parking lot off Los Feliz and walk up the berm to the river. An ARCTIC TERN was at the Piute Ponds (on Big Piute) on Edwards AFB on May 31.
    An EASTERN KINGBIRD was also reported from Piute on May 31.
    Remember that a letter of permission is required for entry. A continuing male VERMILION FLYCATCHER was at Castaic Lagoon on May 28. The DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER that wintered at Ladera Park was reported there through May 27. The TROPICAL KINGBIRD at Entradero Park in Torrance continued around the pond through May 29.
    PURPLE MARTINS included two at the Piute Ponds on Edwards AFB from May 25-26 and two over the west Antelope Valley on May 30. A male BALTIMORE ORIOLE was on San Clemente Island on May 28. A BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER was at the Piute Ponds on Edwards AFB on May 28. An AMERICAN REDSTART was at 961 Richmond Drive in Claremont on May 26. A female type HEPATIC TANAGER was at Chilao Flat in the San Gabriel Mountains on May 26.
    It was along the main road between Little Pines Campground and the main Chilao Campground. A male SUMMER TANAGER was at Sand Dune Park in Manhattan Beach on May 25. ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAKS were on San Clemente Island from May 25-26 and again on May 31, at Leo Carillo State Park by campsite 61 on May 27, at Portuguese Bend Reserve from May 27-28 and at the South Coast Botanic Garden on May 28 (by
    Creek Lane and Tram Road). - end transcript Jon L Fisher Glendale, CA JonF60@... EVENTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS For all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website athttp://www.laaudubon.org
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  23. Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    The Pacific Loon also continued at the same location as of 11:12am today
    (in fact at that time, it was floating alongside the Brant, demonstrating
    that they are the same length). And to correct my earlier comment about
    the beached Red-throated Loon: it's in first-summer (immature) plumage,
    not adult nonbreeding.
    
    The other local Ash-throated Flycatcher also continues. One was at
    Lookout Point Park on May 20 (11:07-11:20am) and May 25 (1:50pm), and one
    was at Shoshonean Road on May 24 (5:11pm) and Cabrillo Marine Aquarium
    parking lot on May 29 (10:53-10:56am).
    
    And concerning my comment about Black Skimmers, "each one has an
    audibly different voice", I should add that I've noticed the same
    thing for most bird species. The reason it came to mind for skimmers is
    that I've been reporting lots of banded ones, and was thinking about
    potential alternative ways to track individuals over time.
    
    Another little note I'd like to add: The Double-crested Cormorants at
    Cabrillo Youth Camp have been very vocal for the past week or more. I
    think I was birding for years before I ever heard one at all. I may not
    still have ever heard a Brown Pelican vocalize.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 10:27, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    I just went down to Cabrillo
    Beach, and as of 9:15am, the Brant continues, this time on the inner
    beach (not the scout camp beach) along with a flock of Black Skimmers,
    California Gulls, and Western Gulls. I also just took a beached
    Red-throated Loon (adult in nonbreeding plumage) from the inner beach to
    IBRRC. I haven't checked yet if the Pacific Loon is still here, but it
    seems healthy; it looked very clean when it showed its belly yesterday
    evening, and was putting its head underwater to look for prey (though
    didn't dive while I watched).
    
    And a third thing I forgot to include: An Olive-sided Flycatcher was
    perching in trees both small and large on the west side of the southern
    stretch of Shoshonean Road (west-adjacent of the Salt Marsh), on May 22
    from 9:02am to 9:18am.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 08:18, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    First of all, I forgot to
    include three things: A Nashville Warbler was in my backyard near
    Cabrillo Beach on May 23 and 24, and a male Phainopepla was at the Greg
    Smith Conifer Grove again on May 20 at 12:10pm. And, for a few days
    starting May 15, there were singing Swainson's Thrushes all over the
    Cabrillo area (in a tree near the dirt ramp down to Cabrillo Beach; in a
    tree in the Marine Aquarium parking lot area; all along the top of the
    slope/cliffside on the west side of Shoshonean Road), just like the
    singing Black-headed Grosbeaks; both species are still around here, but
    not singing anywhere near as much as they were during those few
    days.
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio
    samples on xeno-canto.org , the only
    ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in
    Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I
    am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese White-eye is
    incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at
    least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly
    under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call,
    which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised birds should do the
    same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
    
    Photos still to come later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-28 23:13, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    Yesterday and today (May 27-28) both a Black Brant, and a Pacific Loon in
    absolutely full breeding plumage, were at Cabrillo Youth Camp (during the
    late afternoon, at least, when I looked on both days). The Brant spent
    time both on water and on shore. Both birds can be seen from the boat
    launch dock which is southeast-adjacent to the salt marsh (Salinas de San
    Pedro).
    
    On both May 23 and 25 a Willow Flycatcher showed up in my backyard,
    giving me a new yard bird. (It's possible they weren't even the same
    individual.) Other flycatchers have been especially abundant as well;
    Pacific-slope Flycatchers have been as numerous as I ever remember them
    being here, and Willow Flycatchers might be even more numerous than
    they've been before in my experience (i.e. since 2006). I saw an
    agonistic territorial encounter between two Willow Flycatchers for the
    first time (in my backyard) and one of them made an agonistic call
    sounding identical to a Say's Phoebe agonstic call (a call that many
    Northern Mockingbirds include in their song repertoire) a call which I
    think is most notable for its peculiar lack of
    "aggressive-soundingness" to human ears, in contrast to the
    agonistic calls of most other species. And I have found two Ash-throated
    Flycatchers recently at different local spots, one of them continuing,
    when Ash-throated Flycatchers have been mostly absent in my area for
    years.
    
    The Warbling Vireos are still present in force. I've had at least 6 at
    once in my backyard at times, and they often sing.
    
    I have observed proof of Orange-crowned Warbler nesting success in the
    Salt Marsh / Shoshonean Road area. An Orange-crowned Warbler, whose song
    I recognize from at least one year ago at the same location, fed a
    begging juvenile, and I recognized his identifying physical features from
    having filmed him singing earlier. And at another spot, an Orange-crowned
    Warbler sang for vast swaths of the day (also with a unique recognizable
    song), every day for weeks, and suddenly a few days ago stopped singing
    and started hanging out with a second Orange-crowned Warbler very
    suggestive that this pair are nesting as well.
    
    At least two "Japanese" White-eyes have been quite consipicuous
    in the area, with a Hutton's Vireo like call, showing up often in the
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium parking lot... and today for the first time I'm
    aware of, in my backyard near Cabrillo Beach. (They usually show up as a
    pair together, which for a while made me think there are two in the area,
    but in retrospect the frequency with which I encounter them suggests
    there are quite a bit more than two.) I put "Japanese" in
    quotes because I don't understand why virtually everyone is identifying
    these as Japanese White-eyes. I looked at the various species of
    White-eye (they are numerous) and a large number of them look virtually
    identical I couldn't find any distinguishing characteristics by looking
    at photos. When listing to samples of a large subset of White-eye species
    on xeno-canto.org , I couldn't find
    any that actually matches the Hutton's Vireo like call I most often hear
    from the ones here and in Orange County. Certainly, the Japanese
    White-eye audio samples sound nothing like the ones here. So why do
    birders identify them as Japanese White-eye instead of
    White-eye sp.
    
    Black Skimmers have been sticking around every day lately at the Cabrillo
    Youth Camp shore. They're very vocal whenever another skimmer comes in to
    land with them, and each one has an audibly different voice. I got to see
    a behavior I'd never seen before from this species a fish display. A
    skimmer held the fish in his bill, as if to entice the other skimmers,
    but none of them proved worthy of it (all who tried to take it were
    denied) and eventually he ended up eating it himself.
    
    On May 24 I had my first-of-season Least Tern at Cabrillo Beach dive and
    catch a fish in the water just outside the salt marsh.
    
    A Heermann's Gull adult in breeding plumage was at Cabrillo Beach today
    at 5:33pm. I haven't even seen an immature one since May 12, and hadn't
    seen an adult since March 24.
    
    I will post photos later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
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  25. RE: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    Thank you very much, Kimball.
    
    I did notice that Oriental White-eye recordings are unavailable for
    public access on the site. I was wondering if I should submit a request
    to them, but at the time it seemed unlikely that that particular species
    would be the match. On second thought it's probably worth a try.
    
    I noticed that "Zosterops sp." is an option on eBird, but the
    vast majority of checklists in Southern California use the "Japanese
    White-eye - Zosterops japonicus" option. And just now, I noticed
    that on eBird, "Zosterops sp." and "white-eye sp. -
    Zosterops sp." are actually different options! Searching for one
    will not show the other.
    
    You are absolutely right that the Z. j. simplex recordings from
    mainland China on Xeno-Canto sound much more like our White-eyes than the
    others. This may be why I missed this when listening earlier; there are
    only three recordings matching that on the site, out of 123 Japanese
    White-eye recordings and of those, only two actually sounds like ours,
    and the Hutton's Vireo call with which I was most familiar is rather
    low-key in one of those two.
    
    https://www.xeno-canto.org/209686 - this does sound very similar to
    ours
    
    https://www.xeno-canto.org/325086 - this also sounds similar to ours,
    but the emphasis in the recording is on a different type of call I'm less
    familiar with hearing from them (but am beginning to notice more)
    
    https://www.xeno-canto.org/209685 - this sounds much less like
    ours
    
    But of course, this makes me want to know how the determination was made
    that the White-eyes in those locations are Z. j. simplex , since
    they sound different than Z. j. simplex at other
    locations.
    
    For comparison, here is a recent recording I made of a White-eye in a
    eucalyptus north-adjacent to the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium:
    
    FLAC format ( MiB):
    
    https://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2018_05_22%2008_51_56%20-%20White-eye.flac
    
    MP3 format ( MiB):
    
    https://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2018_05_22%2008_51_56%20-%20White-eye.mp3
    
    The clearest calls heard from the White-eye occur at 22 seconds in.
    (Also heard in this 36.6 second audio clip: American Crow
    juvenile (distant); Hooded Oriole calls; Warbling Vireo song; something I
    didn't notice at the time, but sounds like a pet bird; Black Phoebe
    "chip" and "cheer" calls; Bushtit; Yellow Warbler
    call and song; European Starling. If anyone wants me to keep making
    annotation files with timestamps like I did for the Yellow-breasted Chat,
    please let me know.)
    
    As always, I ask that you please don't use my recordings to trick
    birds to come out into the open, unless there is a very good
    reason for doing so and will not harm/stress the bird(s) or put them at
    risk.
    
    They have been making other types of calls as well (like the ones in
    XC325086, I think), but I don't think I've managed to get a good
    recording of those yet.
    
    Some photos of a White-eye here (frames from video):
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/46139346@N00/albums/72157667517882937/with/28569323358/
    
    Incidentally, I'd like to make a correction to the previous audio
    recording (Yellow-breasted Chat) I posted from here. In the annotations,
    at 5:25.676 I put "CALT juv LAZB". But it was a YEWA (Yellow
    Warbler). Oddly, it was many years before I learned they make that call,
    but since then I've been hearing it a lot.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 13:46, Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    David,
    
    Your questions about the identity of the white-eyes that are increasingly
    well-established in Orange and se. Los Angeles Counties are valid
    ones. Bear in mind that Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus)
    are geographically quite variable, and I wouldnt doubt that there is
    some geographical variation in vocalizations as well. Our birds seem to
    match most closely Japanese White-eyes from mainland China (Z. j.
    simplex); these are not the ones that are in Japan or established on the
    Hawaiian Islands. But some subspecies of Oriental White-eye (Z.
    palpebrosus) are closely similar in appearance to some Japanese
    White-eyes, and youre correct to have some skepticism regarding the
    species identification of our birds. We hope this can be resolved soon
    we have one specimen here at the Natural History Museum (salvaged from
    Orange County), and our colleagues at the Moore Laboratory of Zoology are
    hoping to have the results of their DNA analysis of that specimen
    soon. If you or anybody run across a dead or moribund white-eye,
    please make certain it gets to us to help document our incipient
    populations.
    
    To my ear the calls Ive heard from white-eyes in Orange County and in
    Long Beach seem to match fairly closely some of the calls of Japanese
    White-eye available on Xeno-Canto. Unfortunately, recordings of
    Oriental White-eyes on Xeno-Canto are not available on the web site. As
    Xeno-Canto explains, Some species are under extreme pressure due to
    trapping or harassment. The open availability of high-quality recordings
    of these species can make the problems even worse. For this reason,
    streaming and downloading of these recordings is disabled.
    
    We have been validating eBird entries of Japanese White-eye from southern
    California in order to establish that as the working hypothesis regarding
    identification. If youre searching for white-eye sightings, search
    on that species but also on Zosterops sp. (white-eye sp.), since many
    observers understandably are only comfortable entering sightings at that
    level of certainty. Bottom line: get recordings, and get
    specimens, and well be able to figure out for certain what we
    have.
    
    Kimball
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    
    (213) 763-3368
    
    kgarrett@...
    
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
    From: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    [
    mailto:LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of David Ellsworth
    davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:19 AM
    
    To: LACoBirds
    
    Subject: Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow
    Flycatcher & more (San Pedro)
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio
    samples on xeno-canto.org , the only
    ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in
    Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I
    am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese White-eye is
    incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at
    least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly
    under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call,
    which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised birds should do the
    same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
  26. -back to top-
  27. Re: [LACoBirds] Phainomania LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    I saw what I thought were exceptional numbers on my trips to the bobs gap area earlier in the spring, especially in the riparian near Valyermo. From: LACoBirding on behalf of "Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [LACoBirds]"
    Reply-To: Kimball Garrett
    Date: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 at 1:21 PM
    To: LACoBirding
    Subject: [LACoBirds] Phainomania
    
    Birders, One of the rewards of birding a patch with frequent and consistent coverage is gaining insight into year-to-year differences in species occurrences. This month (May 2018) the Hansen Dam basin has seen a phenomenal incursion of Phainopeplas, which appear to be taking advantage of a bumper crop of golden currant berries as well as abundant berries on the ornamental pepper trees and perhaps the elderberries as well; theyre also doing a lot of sallying for insects. Because my coverage has been pretty consistent for the past several years (4-5 shorter morning visits a week, and more intensive coverage a couple of times a month), the numbers are probably as valid as they are striking: May 2014 total of 17 birds on 9 visits May 2015 total of 1 bird on 1 visit May 2016 zero birds May 2017 total of 3 birds on 1 visit May 2018 total of 241 birds on 18 visits This is also the first year Ive seen nesting evidence (nest building) for Phainopeplas at Hansen Dam. Ive heard from others that Phainopeplas seem more numerous than usual this year in their patches I wonder how geographically widespread this phenomenon is. The good crop of currant fruits may also explain the continuing presence of Cedar Waxwings at Hansen Dam (12+ yesterday, 28 May). Kimball Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology 
  28. -back to top-
  29. Re: [LACoBirds] Phainomania LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    Kimball et Al,
    
    Santa Fe Dam in Irwindale was e-x-a-c-t-l-y like that Saturday afternoon 5/26/18 where I spent hours, yet failed to find a White tailed Kite reported there at 11:30 a.m. I put "60" for Phainopepla but believed that to be an undercount.
    
    Speaking of which, is their (White tailed Kite) number ever going to rebound I have the feeling that there is literally one White tailed Kite wandering back and forth along the foothills of the San Gabriels.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    
    Claremont, CA 91711
    
    cell one: 909.241.3300
    
    cell two: 213.471.6001
    
    home: 909.445.1456
    
    office: 213.351.7382
    
    office main 213.351.7897
    
    www.tgmiko.com
    
    From: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 1:20:46 PM
    
    To: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: [LACoBirds] Phainomania
    
    Birders, One of the rewards of birding a patch with frequent and consistent coverage is gaining insight into year-to-year differences in species occurrences. This month (May 2018) the Hansen Dam basin has seen a phenomenal incursion of Phainopeplas,
    which appear to be taking advantage of a bumper crop of golden currant berries as well as abundant berries on the ornamental pepper trees and perhaps the elderberries as well; theyre also doing a lot of sallying for insects. Because my coverage has been pretty
    consistent for the past several years (4-5 shorter morning visits a week, and more intensive coverage a couple of times a month), the numbers are probably as valid as they are striking: May 2014 total of 17 birds on 9 visits May 2015 total of 1 bird on 1 visit May 2016 zero birds May 2017 total of 3 birds on 1 visit May 2018 total of 241 birds on 18 visits This is also the first year Ive seen nesting evidence (nest building) for Phainopeplas at Hansen Dam. Ive heard from others that Phainopeplas seem more numerous than usual this year in their patches I wonder how geographically widespread
    this phenomenon is. The good crop of currant fruits may also explain the continuing presence of Cedar Waxwings at Hansen Dam (12+ yesterday, 28 May). Kimball Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology 
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.