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 May, 2018 - 6 e-mail(s)...
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   Japanese White-eye
Japanese White-eye
Zosterops japonicus


   Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) - JAWE (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    The Pacific Loon also continued at the same location as of 11:12am today
    (in fact at that time, it was floating alongside the Brant, demonstrating
    that they are the same length). And to correct my earlier comment about
    the beached Red-throated Loon: it's in first-summer (immature) plumage,
    not adult nonbreeding.
    
    The other local Ash-throated Flycatcher also continues. One was at
    Lookout Point Park on May 20 (11:07-11:20am) and May 25 (1:50pm), and one
    was at Shoshonean Road on May 24 (5:11pm) and Cabrillo Marine Aquarium
    parking lot on May 29 (10:53-10:56am).
    
    And concerning my comment about Black Skimmers, "each one has an
    audibly different voice", I should add that I've noticed the same
    thing for most bird species. The reason it came to mind for skimmers is
    that I've been reporting lots of banded ones, and was thinking about
    potential alternative ways to track individuals over time.
    
    Another little note I'd like to add: The Double-crested Cormorants at
    Cabrillo Youth Camp have been very vocal for the past week or more. I
    think I was birding for years before I ever heard one at all. I may not
    still have ever heard a Brown Pelican vocalize.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 10:27, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    I just went down to Cabrillo
    Beach, and as of 9:15am, the Brant continues, this time on the inner
    beach (not the scout camp beach) along with a flock of Black Skimmers,
    California Gulls, and Western Gulls. I also just took a beached
    Red-throated Loon (adult in nonbreeding plumage) from the inner beach to
    IBRRC. I haven't checked yet if the Pacific Loon is still here, but it
    seems healthy; it looked very clean when it showed its belly yesterday
    evening, and was putting its head underwater to look for prey (though
    didn't dive while I watched).
    
    And a third thing I forgot to include: An Olive-sided Flycatcher was
    perching in trees both small and large on the west side of the southern
    stretch of Shoshonean Road (west-adjacent of the Salt Marsh), on May 22
    from 9:02am to 9:18am.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 08:18, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    First of all, I forgot to
    include three things: A Nashville Warbler was in my backyard near
    Cabrillo Beach on May 23 and 24, and a male Phainopepla was at the Greg
    Smith Conifer Grove again on May 20 at 12:10pm. And, for a few days
    starting May 15, there were singing Swainson's Thrushes all over the
    Cabrillo area (in a tree near the dirt ramp down to Cabrillo Beach; in a
    tree in the Marine Aquarium parking lot area; all along the top of the
    slope/cliffside on the west side of Shoshonean Road), just like the
    singing Black-headed Grosbeaks; both species are still around here, but
    not singing anywhere near as much as they were during those few
    days.
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio
    samples on xeno-canto.org , the only
    ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in
    Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I
    am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese White-eye is
    incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at
    least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly
    under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call,
    which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised birds should do the
    same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
    
    Photos still to come later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-28 23:13, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    Yesterday and today (May 27-28) both a Black Brant, and a Pacific Loon in
    absolutely full breeding plumage, were at Cabrillo Youth Camp (during the
    late afternoon, at least, when I looked on both days). The Brant spent
    time both on water and on shore. Both birds can be seen from the boat
    launch dock which is southeast-adjacent to the salt marsh (Salinas de San
    Pedro).
    
    On both May 23 and 25 a Willow Flycatcher showed up in my backyard,
    giving me a new yard bird. (It's possible they weren't even the same
    individual.) Other flycatchers have been especially abundant as well;
    Pacific-slope Flycatchers have been as numerous as I ever remember them
    being here, and Willow Flycatchers might be even more numerous than
    they've been before in my experience (i.e. since 2006). I saw an
    agonistic territorial encounter between two Willow Flycatchers for the
    first time (in my backyard) and one of them made an agonistic call
    sounding identical to a Say's Phoebe agonstic call (a call that many
    Northern Mockingbirds include in their song repertoire) a call which I
    think is most notable for its peculiar lack of
    "aggressive-soundingness" to human ears, in contrast to the
    agonistic calls of most other species. And I have found two Ash-throated
    Flycatchers recently at different local spots, one of them continuing,
    when Ash-throated Flycatchers have been mostly absent in my area for
    years.
    
    The Warbling Vireos are still present in force. I've had at least 6 at
    once in my backyard at times, and they often sing.
    
    I have observed proof of Orange-crowned Warbler nesting success in the
    Salt Marsh / Shoshonean Road area. An Orange-crowned Warbler, whose song
    I recognize from at least one year ago at the same location, fed a
    begging juvenile, and I recognized his identifying physical features from
    having filmed him singing earlier. And at another spot, an Orange-crowned
    Warbler sang for vast swaths of the day (also with a unique recognizable
    song), every day for weeks, and suddenly a few days ago stopped singing
    and started hanging out with a second Orange-crowned Warbler very
    suggestive that this pair are nesting as well.
    
    At least two "Japanese" White-eyes have been quite consipicuous
    in the area, with a Hutton's Vireo like call, showing up often in the
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium parking lot... and today for the first time I'm
    aware of, in my backyard near Cabrillo Beach. (They usually show up as a
    pair together, which for a while made me think there are two in the area,
    but in retrospect the frequency with which I encounter them suggests
    there are quite a bit more than two.) I put "Japanese" in
    quotes because I don't understand why virtually everyone is identifying
    these as Japanese White-eyes. I looked at the various species of
    White-eye (they are numerous) and a large number of them look virtually
    identical I couldn't find any distinguishing characteristics by looking
    at photos. When listing to samples of a large subset of White-eye species
    on xeno-canto.org , I couldn't find
    any that actually matches the Hutton's Vireo like call I most often hear
    from the ones here and in Orange County. Certainly, the Japanese
    White-eye audio samples sound nothing like the ones here. So why do
    birders identify them as Japanese White-eye instead of
    White-eye sp.
    
    Black Skimmers have been sticking around every day lately at the Cabrillo
    Youth Camp shore. They're very vocal whenever another skimmer comes in to
    land with them, and each one has an audibly different voice. I got to see
    a behavior I'd never seen before from this species a fish display. A
    skimmer held the fish in his bill, as if to entice the other skimmers,
    but none of them proved worthy of it (all who tried to take it were
    denied) and eventually he ended up eating it himself.
    
    On May 24 I had my first-of-season Least Tern at Cabrillo Beach dive and
    catch a fish in the water just outside the salt marsh.
    
    A Heermann's Gull adult in breeding plumage was at Cabrillo Beach today
    at 5:33pm. I haven't even seen an immature one since May 12, and hadn't
    seen an adult since March 24.
    
    I will post photos later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
  2. -back to top-
  3. RE: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    Thank you very much, Kimball.
    
    I did notice that Oriental White-eye recordings are unavailable for
    public access on the site. I was wondering if I should submit a request
    to them, but at the time it seemed unlikely that that particular species
    would be the match. On second thought it's probably worth a try.
    
    I noticed that "Zosterops sp." is an option on eBird, but the
    vast majority of checklists in Southern California use the "Japanese
    White-eye - Zosterops japonicus" option. And just now, I noticed
    that on eBird, "Zosterops sp." and "white-eye sp. -
    Zosterops sp." are actually different options! Searching for one
    will not show the other.
    
    You are absolutely right that the Z. j. simplex recordings from
    mainland China on Xeno-Canto sound much more like our White-eyes than the
    others. This may be why I missed this when listening earlier; there are
    only three recordings matching that on the site, out of 123 Japanese
    White-eye recordings and of those, only two actually sounds like ours,
    and the Hutton's Vireo call with which I was most familiar is rather
    low-key in one of those two.
    
    https://www.xeno-canto.org/209686 - this does sound very similar to
    ours
    
    https://www.xeno-canto.org/325086 - this also sounds similar to ours,
    but the emphasis in the recording is on a different type of call I'm less
    familiar with hearing from them (but am beginning to notice more)
    
    https://www.xeno-canto.org/209685 - this sounds much less like
    ours
    
    But of course, this makes me want to know how the determination was made
    that the White-eyes in those locations are Z. j. simplex , since
    they sound different than Z. j. simplex at other
    locations.
    
    For comparison, here is a recent recording I made of a White-eye in a
    eucalyptus north-adjacent to the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium:
    
    FLAC format ( MiB):
    
    https://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2018_05_22%2008_51_56%20-%20White-eye.flac
    
    MP3 format ( MiB):
    
    https://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2018_05_22%2008_51_56%20-%20White-eye.mp3
    
    The clearest calls heard from the White-eye occur at 22 seconds in.
    (Also heard in this 36.6 second audio clip: American Crow
    juvenile (distant); Hooded Oriole calls; Warbling Vireo song; something I
    didn't notice at the time, but sounds like a pet bird; Black Phoebe
    "chip" and "cheer" calls; Bushtit; Yellow Warbler
    call and song; European Starling. If anyone wants me to keep making
    annotation files with timestamps like I did for the Yellow-breasted Chat,
    please let me know.)
    
    As always, I ask that you please don't use my recordings to trick
    birds to come out into the open, unless there is a very good
    reason for doing so and will not harm/stress the bird(s) or put them at
    risk.
    
    They have been making other types of calls as well (like the ones in
    XC325086, I think), but I don't think I've managed to get a good
    recording of those yet.
    
    Some photos of a White-eye here (frames from video):
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/46139346@N00/albums/72157667517882937/with/28569323358/
    
    Incidentally, I'd like to make a correction to the previous audio
    recording (Yellow-breasted Chat) I posted from here. In the annotations,
    at 5:25.676 I put "CALT juv LAZB". But it was a YEWA (Yellow
    Warbler). Oddly, it was many years before I learned they make that call,
    but since then I've been hearing it a lot.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 13:46, Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    David,
    
    Your questions about the identity of the white-eyes that are increasingly
    well-established in Orange and se. Los Angeles Counties are valid
    ones. Bear in mind that Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus)
    are geographically quite variable, and I wouldnt doubt that there is
    some geographical variation in vocalizations as well. Our birds seem to
    match most closely Japanese White-eyes from mainland China (Z. j.
    simplex); these are not the ones that are in Japan or established on the
    Hawaiian Islands. But some subspecies of Oriental White-eye (Z.
    palpebrosus) are closely similar in appearance to some Japanese
    White-eyes, and youre correct to have some skepticism regarding the
    species identification of our birds. We hope this can be resolved soon
    we have one specimen here at the Natural History Museum (salvaged from
    Orange County), and our colleagues at the Moore Laboratory of Zoology are
    hoping to have the results of their DNA analysis of that specimen
    soon. If you or anybody run across a dead or moribund white-eye,
    please make certain it gets to us to help document our incipient
    populations.
    
    To my ear the calls Ive heard from white-eyes in Orange County and in
    Long Beach seem to match fairly closely some of the calls of Japanese
    White-eye available on Xeno-Canto. Unfortunately, recordings of
    Oriental White-eyes on Xeno-Canto are not available on the web site. As
    Xeno-Canto explains, Some species are under extreme pressure due to
    trapping or harassment. The open availability of high-quality recordings
    of these species can make the problems even worse. For this reason,
    streaming and downloading of these recordings is disabled.
    
    We have been validating eBird entries of Japanese White-eye from southern
    California in order to establish that as the working hypothesis regarding
    identification. If youre searching for white-eye sightings, search
    on that species but also on Zosterops sp. (white-eye sp.), since many
    observers understandably are only comfortable entering sightings at that
    level of certainty. Bottom line: get recordings, and get
    specimens, and well be able to figure out for certain what we
    have.
    
    Kimball
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    
    (213) 763-3368
    
    kgarrett@...
    
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
    From: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    [
    mailto:LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of David Ellsworth
    davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:19 AM
    
    To: LACoBirds
    
    Subject: Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow
    Flycatcher & more (San Pedro)
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio
    samples on xeno-canto.org , the only
    ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in
    Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I
    am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese White-eye is
    incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at
    least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly
    under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call,
    which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised birds should do the
    same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
  4. -back to top-
  5. RE: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    David, Your questions about the identity of the white-eyes that are increasingly well-established in Orange and se. Los Angeles Counties are valid ones. Bear in mind
    that Japanese White-eyes (Zosterops japonicus) are geographically quite variable, and I wouldnt doubt that there is some geographical variation in vocalizations as well. Our birds seem to match most closely Japanese White-eyes from mainland China (Z. j. simplex);
    these are not the ones that are in Japan or established on the Hawaiian Islands. But some subspecies of Oriental White-eye (Z. palpebrosus) are closely similar in appearance to some Japanese White-eyes, and youre correct to have some skepticism regarding
    the species identification of our birds. We hope this can be resolved soon we have one specimen here at the Natural History Museum (salvaged from Orange County), and our colleagues at the Moore Laboratory of Zoology are hoping to have the results of their
    DNA analysis of that specimen soon. If you or anybody run across a dead or moribund white-eye, please make certain it gets to us to help document our incipient populations. To my ear the calls Ive heard from white-eyes in Orange County and in Long Beach seem to match fairly closely some of the calls of Japanese White-eye available
    on Xeno-Canto. Unfortunately, recordings of Oriental White-eyes on Xeno-Canto are not available on the web site. As Xeno-Canto explains, Some species
    are under extreme pressure due to trapping or harassment. The open availability of high-quality recordings of these species can make the problems even worse. For this reason, streaming and downloading of these recordings is disabled. We have been validating eBird entries of Japanese White-eye from southern California in order to establish that as the working hypothesis regarding
    identification. If youre searching for white-eye sightings, search on that species but also on Zosterops sp. (white-eye sp.), since many observers understandably are only comfortable entering sightings at that level of certainty. Bottom line: get recordings,
    and get specimens, and well be able to figure out for certain what we have. Kimball
    Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    From: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com [mailto:LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com]
    On Behalf Of David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 8:19 AM
    
    To: LACoBirds
    
    Subject: Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro)
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio samples on
    xeno-canto.org , the only ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese
    White-eye is incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call, which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised
    birds should do the same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
  6. -back to top-
  7. Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    I just went down to Cabrillo Beach, and as of 9:15am, the Brant
    continues, this time on the inner beach (not the scout camp beach) along
    with a flock of Black Skimmers, California Gulls, and Western Gulls. I
    also just took a beached Red-throated Loon (adult in nonbreeding plumage)
    from the inner beach to IBRRC. I haven't checked yet if the Pacific Loon
    is still here, but it seems healthy; it looked very clean when it showed
    its belly yesterday evening, and was putting its head underwater to look
    for prey (though didn't dive while I watched).
    
    And a third thing I forgot to include: An Olive-sided Flycatcher was
    perching in trees both small and large on the west side of the southern
    stretch of Shoshonean Road (west-adjacent of the Salt Marsh), on May 22
    from 9:02am to 9:18am.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-29 08:18, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    First of all, I forgot to
    include three things: A Nashville Warbler was in my backyard near
    Cabrillo Beach on May 23 and 24, and a male Phainopepla was at the Greg
    Smith Conifer Grove again on May 20 at 12:10pm. And, for a few days
    starting May 15, there were singing Swainson's Thrushes all over the
    Cabrillo area (in a tree near the dirt ramp down to Cabrillo Beach; in a
    tree in the Marine Aquarium parking lot area; all along the top of the
    slope/cliffside on the west side of Shoshonean Road), just like the
    singing Black-headed Grosbeaks; both species are still around here, but
    not singing anywhere near as much as they were during those few
    days.
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio
    samples on xeno-canto.org , the only
    ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in
    Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I
    am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese White-eye is
    incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at
    least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly
    under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call,
    which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised birds should do the
    same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
    
    Photos still to come later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-28 23:13, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    Yesterday and today (May 27-28) both a Black Brant, and a Pacific Loon in
    absolutely full breeding plumage, were at Cabrillo Youth Camp (during the
    late afternoon, at least, when I looked on both days). The Brant spent
    time both on water and on shore. Both birds can be seen from the boat
    launch dock which is southeast-adjacent to the salt marsh (Salinas de San
    Pedro).
    
    On both May 23 and 25 a Willow Flycatcher showed up in my backyard,
    giving me a new yard bird. (It's possible they weren't even the same
    individual.) Other flycatchers have been especially abundant as well;
    Pacific-slope Flycatchers have been as numerous as I ever remember them
    being here, and Willow Flycatchers might be even more numerous than
    they've been before in my experience (i.e. since 2006). I saw an
    agonistic territorial encounter between two Willow Flycatchers for the
    first time (in my backyard) and one of them made an agonistic call
    sounding identical to a Say's Phoebe agonstic call (a call that many
    Northern Mockingbirds include in their song repertoire) a call which I
    think is most notable for its peculiar lack of
    "aggressive-soundingness" to human ears, in contrast to the
    agonistic calls of most other species. And I have found two Ash-throated
    Flycatchers recently at different local spots, one of them continuing,
    when Ash-throated Flycatchers have been mostly absent in my area for
    years.
    
    The Warbling Vireos are still present in force. I've had at least 6 at
    once in my backyard at times, and they often sing.
    
    I have observed proof of Orange-crowned Warbler nesting success in the
    Salt Marsh / Shoshonean Road area. An Orange-crowned Warbler, whose song
    I recognize from at least one year ago at the same location, fed a
    begging juvenile, and I recognized his identifying physical features from
    having filmed him singing earlier. And at another spot, an Orange-crowned
    Warbler sang for vast swaths of the day (also with a unique recognizable
    song), every day for weeks, and suddenly a few days ago stopped singing
    and started hanging out with a second Orange-crowned Warbler very
    suggestive that this pair are nesting as well.
    
    At least two "Japanese" White-eyes have been quite consipicuous
    in the area, with a Hutton's Vireo like call, showing up often in the
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium parking lot... and today for the first time I'm
    aware of, in my backyard near Cabrillo Beach. (They usually show up as a
    pair together, which for a while made me think there are two in the area,
    but in retrospect the frequency with which I encounter them suggests
    there are quite a bit more than two.) I put "Japanese" in
    quotes because I don't understand why virtually everyone is identifying
    these as Japanese White-eyes. I looked at the various species of
    White-eye (they are numerous) and a large number of them look virtually
    identical I couldn't find any distinguishing characteristics by looking
    at photos. When listing to samples of a large subset of White-eye species
    on xeno-canto.org , I couldn't find
    any that actually matches the Hutton's Vireo like call I most often hear
    from the ones here and in Orange County. Certainly, the Japanese
    White-eye audio samples sound nothing like the ones here. So why do
    birders identify them as Japanese White-eye instead of
    White-eye sp.
    
    Black Skimmers have been sticking around every day lately at the Cabrillo
    Youth Camp shore. They're very vocal whenever another skimmer comes in to
    land with them, and each one has an audibly different voice. I got to see
    a behavior I'd never seen before from this species a fish display. A
    skimmer held the fish in his bill, as if to entice the other skimmers,
    but none of them proved worthy of it (all who tried to take it were
    denied) and eventually he ended up eating it himself.
    
    On May 24 I had my first-of-season Least Tern at Cabrillo Beach dive and
    catch a fish in the water just outside the salt marsh.
    
    A Heermann's Gull adult in breeding plumage was at Cabrillo Beach today
    at 5:33pm. I haven't even seen an immature one since May 12, and hadn't
    seen an adult since March 24.
    
    I will post photos later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
  8. -back to top-
  9. Re: [LACoBirds] Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 29, 2018, 24 day(s) ago
    First of all, I forgot to include three things: A Nashville Warbler was
    in my backyard near Cabrillo Beach on May 23 and 24, and a male
    Phainopepla was at the Greg Smith Conifer Grove again on May 20 at
    12:10pm. And, for a few days starting May 15, there were singing
    Swainson's Thrushes all over the Cabrillo area (in a tree near the dirt
    ramp down to Cabrillo Beach; in a tree in the Marine Aquarium parking lot
    area; all along the top of the slope/cliffside on the west side of
    Shoshonean Road), just like the singing Black-headed Grosbeaks; both
    species are still around here, but not singing anywhere near as much as
    they were during those few days.
    
    Secondly, I wanted to add that of all the Japanese White-eye audio
    samples on xeno-canto.org , the only
    ones that actually sounded like ours here were two recordings made in
    Orange County. None of the recordings made in Japan sounded like ours. I
    am inclined to believe that the identification of Japanese White-eye is
    incorrect, and they're in fact some other species of White-eye (or at
    least, a subspecies of Japanese White-eye that is vastly
    under-represented on xeno-canto); the call sounds like an innate call,
    which wouldn't need to be learned, so captive-raised birds should do the
    same calls as wild ones in their native habitat, right
    
    Photos still to come later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2018-05-28 23:13, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    Yesterday and today (May 27-28) both a Black Brant, and a Pacific Loon in
    absolutely full breeding plumage, were at Cabrillo Youth Camp (during the
    late afternoon, at least, when I looked on both days). The Brant spent
    time both on water and on shore. Both birds can be seen from the boat
    launch dock which is southeast-adjacent to the salt marsh (Salinas de San
    Pedro).
    
    On both May 23 and 25 a Willow Flycatcher showed up in my backyard,
    giving me a new yard bird. (It's possible they weren't even the same
    individual.) Other flycatchers have been especially abundant as well;
    Pacific-slope Flycatchers have been as numerous as I ever remember them
    being here, and Willow Flycatchers might be even more numerous than
    they've been before in my experience (i.e. since 2006). I saw an
    agonistic territorial encounter between two Willow Flycatchers for the
    first time (in my backyard) and one of them made an agonistic call
    sounding identical to a Say's Phoebe agonstic call (a call that many
    Northern Mockingbirds include in their song repertoire) a call which I
    think is most notable for its peculiar lack of
    "aggressive-soundingness" to human ears, in contrast to the
    agonistic calls of most other species. And I have found two Ash-throated
    Flycatchers recently at different local spots, one of them continuing,
    when Ash-throated Flycatchers have been mostly absent in my area for
    years.
    
    The Warbling Vireos are still present in force. I've had at least 6 at
    once in my backyard at times, and they often sing.
    
    I have observed proof of Orange-crowned Warbler nesting success in the
    Salt Marsh / Shoshonean Road area. An Orange-crowned Warbler, whose song
    I recognize from at least one year ago at the same location, fed a
    begging juvenile, and I recognized his identifying physical features from
    having filmed him singing earlier. And at another spot, an Orange-crowned
    Warbler sang for vast swaths of the day (also with a unique recognizable
    song), every day for weeks, and suddenly a few days ago stopped singing
    and started hanging out with a second Orange-crowned Warbler very
    suggestive that this pair are nesting as well.
    
    At least two "Japanese" White-eyes have been quite consipicuous
    in the area, with a Hutton's Vireo like call, showing up often in the
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium parking lot... and today for the first time I'm
    aware of, in my backyard near Cabrillo Beach. (They usually show up as a
    pair together, which for a while made me think there are two in the area,
    but in retrospect the frequency with which I encounter them suggests
    there are quite a bit more than two.) I put "Japanese" in
    quotes because I don't understand why virtually everyone is identifying
    these as Japanese White-eyes. I looked at the various species of
    White-eye (they are numerous) and a large number of them look virtually
    identical I couldn't find any distinguishing characteristics by looking
    at photos. When listing to samples of a large subset of White-eye species
    on xeno-canto.org , I couldn't find
    any that actually matches the Hutton's Vireo like call I most often hear
    from the ones here and in Orange County. Certainly, the Japanese
    White-eye audio samples sound nothing like the ones here. So why do
    birders identify them as Japanese White-eye instead of
    White-eye sp.
    
    Black Skimmers have been sticking around every day lately at the Cabrillo
    Youth Camp shore. They're very vocal whenever another skimmer comes in to
    land with them, and each one has an audibly different voice. I got to see
    a behavior I'd never seen before from this species a fish display. A
    skimmer held the fish in his bill, as if to entice the other skimmers,
    but none of them proved worthy of it (all who tried to take it were
    denied) and eventually he ended up eating it himself.
    
    On May 24 I had my first-of-season Least Tern at Cabrillo Beach dive and
    catch a fish in the water just outside the salt marsh.
    
    A Heermann's Gull adult in breeding plumage was at Cabrillo Beach today
    at 5:33pm. I haven't even seen an immature one since May 12, and hadn't
    seen an adult since March 24.
    
    I will post photos later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
  10. -back to top-
  11. Continuing Brant, Pacific Loon, Willow Flycatcher & more (San Pedro) LINK
    DATE: May 28, 2018 @ 11:13pm, 24 day(s) ago
    Yesterday and today (May 27-28) both a Black Brant, and a Pacific Loon in
    absolutely full breeding plumage, were at Cabrillo Youth Camp (during the
    late afternoon, at least, when I looked on both days). The Brant spent
    time both on water and on shore. Both birds can be seen from the boat
    launch dock which is southeast-adjacent to the salt marsh (Salinas de San
    Pedro).
    
    On both May 23 and 25 a Willow Flycatcher showed up in my backyard,
    giving me a new yard bird. (It's possible they weren't even the same
    individual.) Other flycatchers have been especially abundant as well;
    Pacific-slope Flycatchers have been as numerous as I ever remember them
    being here, and Willow Flycatchers might be even more numerous than
    they've been before in my experience (i.e. since 2006). I saw an
    agonistic territorial encounter between two Willow Flycatchers for the
    first time (in my backyard) and one of them made an agonistic call
    sounding identical to a Say's Phoebe agonstic call (a call that many
    Northern Mockingbirds include in their song repertoire) a call which I
    think is most notable for its peculiar lack of
    "aggressive-soundingness" to human ears, in contrast to the
    agonistic calls of most other species. And I have found two Ash-throated
    Flycatchers recently at different local spots, one of them continuing,
    when Ash-throated Flycatchers have been mostly absent in my area for
    years.
    
    The Warbling Vireos are still present in force. I've had at least 6 at
    once in my backyard at times, and they often sing.
    
    I have observed proof of Orange-crowned Warbler nesting success in the
    Salt Marsh / Shoshonean Road area. An Orange-crowned Warbler, whose song
    I recognize from at least one year ago at the same location, fed a
    begging juvenile, and I recognized his identifying physical features from
    having filmed him singing earlier. And at another spot, an Orange-crowned
    Warbler sang for vast swaths of the day (also with a unique recognizable
    song), every day for weeks, and suddenly a few days ago stopped singing
    and started hanging out with a second Orange-crowned Warbler very
    suggestive that this pair are nesting as well.
    
    At least two "Japanese" White-eyes have been quite consipicuous
    in the area, with a Hutton's Vireo like call, showing up often in the
    Cabrillo Marine Aquarium parking lot... and today for the first time I'm
    aware of, in my backyard near Cabrillo Beach. (They usually show up as a
    pair together, which for a while made me think there are two in the area,
    but in retrospect the frequency with which I encounter them suggests
    there are quite a bit more than two.) I put "Japanese" in
    quotes because I don't understand why virtually everyone is identifying
    these as Japanese White-eyes. I looked at the various species of
    White-eye (they are numerous) and a large number of them look virtually
    identical I couldn't find any distinguishing characteristics by looking
    at photos. When listing to samples of a large subset of White-eye species
    on xeno-canto.org , I couldn't find
    any that actually matches the Hutton's Vireo like call I most often hear
    from the ones here and in Orange County. Certainly, the Japanese
    White-eye audio samples sound nothing like the ones here. So why do
    birders identify them as Japanese White-eye instead of
    White-eye sp.
    
    Black Skimmers have been sticking around every day lately at the Cabrillo
    Youth Camp shore. They're very vocal whenever another skimmer comes in to
    land with them, and each one has an audibly different voice. I got to see
    a behavior I'd never seen before from this species a fish display. A
    skimmer held the fish in his bill, as if to entice the other skimmers,
    but none of them proved worthy of it (all who tried to take it were
    denied) and eventually he ended up eating it himself.
    
    On May 24 I had my first-of-season Least Tern at Cabrillo Beach dive and
    catch a fish in the water just outside the salt marsh.
    
    A Heermann's Gull adult in breeding plumage was at Cabrillo Beach today
    at 5:33pm. I haven't even seen an immature one since May 12, and hadn't
    seen an adult since March 24.
    
    I will post photos later.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
  12. -back to top-
  13. Spring migration, other recent notes LINK
    DATE: Apr 22, 2018 @ 1:58pm, 60 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    This morning (22 April) in the western San Gabriel mountains produced one of the more impressive flights of migrants I can recall seeing in Los Angeles County--the scale was reminiscent of a good day at Butterbredt Spring. For example, in just eight minutes, soon after sunrise near May Canyon Saddle (at the intersection of the Santa Clara Truck Trail and May Canyon TKTR) standing in one place I counted:
    
    Orange-crowned Warbler: 18
    Nashville Warbler: 1
    MacGillivray's Warbler: 6
    Audubon's Warbler: 2
    Black-throated Gray Warbler: 15
    Townsend's Warbler: 2
    Hermit Warbler: 4
    Wilson's Warbler: 13
    warbler sp: 40+
    Lazuli Bunting: 6
    
    All of these migrants were passing very low over the ridge, going roughly northeast, and not stopping. I was conducting point counts and had to continue down the trail, but conditions were similar, with many of the same species in roughly similar proportions streaming up the hillside, as well as some numbers of Ash-throated Flycatchers, Western Kingbirds, hummingbirds, and Warbling Vireos. Wind was very light on the saddle, a little bit stronger in parts going downhill; skies were lightly covered in high clouds.
    
    And just a few other recent notes from the last week or so (some of which is possibly of use for the ABC):
    
    -at least one white-eye (presumably a Japanese White-eye as everyone calls them) was at Bixby Park in Long Beach, where I saw at least four of them a year ago.
    
    -Huntington Park Civic Park on 19 April held the usual flock of White-winged Parakeets, a pair of Spotted Doves (now nesting), and a Plumbeous Vireo.
    
    -a male Vermilion Flycatcher, first found by Jonathan Rowley, continued at La Mirada Park on 19 April, and was often singing.
    
    -a sort-of late-ish Common Goldeneye was at Lake Palmdale 17 April. Others have posted about the continuing Gray Vireo at Bob's Gap. At least one Gray Flycatcher had arrived at Ball Flat Rd as well.
    
    -there were several late-ish Ferruginous Hawks in the western Antelope Valley on 14 April: two at Quail Lake and one just west of Neenach, where the 138 meets 270th St. W.
    
    John Garrett
    Pasadena
  14. -back to top-
  15. Ken Malloy/Harbor Regional Park Notes (a bit long) LINK
    DATE: Jan 22, 2013 @ 9:02pm, 5 year(s) ago
    Thanks, Gjon, for letting us know where the BHV is when not in the area where it
    has been most often seen. I suspect that the bird ranges widely in the north end
    but may come down to the chainlink-fenced "Vermont storm drain" near the
    southern of the two play areas (the play equipment is orange and blue) in the
    west side of the park to bathe and/or drink. My experience is that many birds
    bathe in the channel under the dense Brazilian pepper in the drain, then return
    to wherever they normally "hang out".
    The Wilson's and Yellow Warbler, as well as a Black-and-White, have all been in
    the North End Willows all winter. There has been a Japanese White-eye in there
    for several years, but I haven't seen it this year.
    Besides David Bell's Swamp Sparrows and his bizarre gulls (did the one that
    wasn't the Nelson's ever get identified)  there have been some unusual local
    occurrences of White Pelican, Northern Harrier, Turkey Vulture, Golden-crowned
    Kinglets, WB as well as the ubiquitous RB Nuthatches, and an exceptionally rare
    (at the park) Bewick's Wren at various locations in the park. There is a Palm
    Warbler and a Red-naped Sapsucker in the area near the park by Harbor College,
    and there was a Common Poorwill on the adjacent Golf Course in November.Hope
    folks continue to seek out all the as-yet-unfound rarities at the park! 
    Just to avoid folks thinking that the Army Corps is at it again, note that
    significant restoration work (Prop O) will (ostensibly) begin in April in the
    Wilmington Channel North of the drain, specifically to create Bell's Vireo
    habitat (as well as prevent flooding). Shortly after, dredging of the lake will
    begin, and will occur in 5 stages. A huge amount of non-native vegetation will
    be removed in all the lowland areas, and much other work will be done as well. I
    have been involved in the planning of the project from the start (about 8 years
    ago), and I really believe that despite the inevitable disturbance, the ultimate
    result will be a much richer, cleaner, and safe environment at the park. Just
    hope they finish before I am not alive to see it!
    
    Martin ByhowerLomita
    
    Palos Verdes/South Bay Audubon
    
    Time flies like an arrow...
    
    Fruit flies like a banana
    
    -Mr. Moose
    
    --- On Mon, 1/21/13, Gjon Hazard gjon_hazard@...> wrote:
    
    From: Gjon Hazard gjon_hazard@...>
    Subject: Re: [LACoBirds] Blue-headed Vireo at KMHRP, 21 Jan 2013
    To: "LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com" LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com>
    Date: Monday, January 21, 2013, 8:56 PM
    
     
    
    Just to be clear about the location. The bird was ranging widely along the
    north edge of the "North End Willows", which is along Pacific Coast Hwy --
    roughly across from Dodge Ave.
    
    Others saw swamp sparrows at various spots along the lake's edge.
    
    Also present was a dull male Yellow Warbler in the ficus trees at the entrance
    to the parking lot off Vermont. Plus, at various spots, several Townsend's &
    Black-throated Gray Warblers. I also heard what was probably a Wilson's Warbler
    while the vireo was being seen, but I didn't investigate it further.
    
    -Gjon Hazard
    
    Encinitas
    
    (Sent from my iPad)
    
    On Jan 21, 2013, at 6:50 PM, "Jim" jaybirder@...> wrote:
    
    > As a follow-up to Dinuk's earlier post, here is my description of the bird as
    posted to eBird.org:
    
    >
    
    > Blue-headed Vireo 1 Continuing bird refound by Gjon Hazard was seen well
    for 10-15 minutes by many. Blue-gray head contrasting with white throat and
    breast; white wingbars, yellow edging on primaries; large head and eye with
    'spectacle'; yellow-green on flanks and lower belly/vent; white undertail. Bird
    was located foraging actively in moderately dense cover, but eventually moved to
    more open perches, slowing down to allow very good looks and many photos taken
    by those present. Subsequently seen again later by other members of the group.
    
    >
    
    > Jim Hardesty
    
    > Southwest Bird Study Club
    
    > Woodland Hills CA
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    > ------------------------------------
    
    >
    
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  16. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.