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 Aug, 2012 - 5 e-mail(s)...
 Feb, 2003 - 4 e-mail(s)...



   Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Tyrannus forficatus


   Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) - STFL (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Los Angeles RBA- 25 May 2018 LINK
    DATE: TODAY @ 10:42am
    - RBA * California * Los Angeles RBA *May 25, 2018 * CALA1805.25
    
     -Birds mentioned
    
    Chimney Swift Neotropic Cormorant Brown Pelican Yellow-crowned Night-Heron California Condor Dusky-capped Flycatcher Tropical Kingbird Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Purple Martin Bank Swallow Baltimore Oriole Ovenbird Northern Waterthrush Black-and-white Warbler Summer Tanager
    
     California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate on the rare bird report form):http://www.californiabirds.org/
    
     Enter your bird sightings on eBird:http://ebird.org/content/ebird
    
     Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher atJonF60@... Coverage: Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted
    
     -Transcript
    
    This is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for May 25.
    
    At least one CHIMNEY SWIFT was seen along the LA River just above the Los Feliz crossing in Glendale/Atwater Village from May 21-23.
    Park in the golf course parking lot off Los Feliz, or at North Atwater Park and walk down to Los Feliz.
    
    Continuing at Bonelli Regional Park in San Dimas through May 19 was a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT.
    It has usually been near the north shore of the reservoir, sometimes across from the RV Park.
    A PURPLE MARTIN was at the northeast corner of the lake on May 20.
    
    The BROWN PELICAN at Lake Balboa in the San Fernando Valley was observed through May 22.
     A YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON continued at Sim's Pond Bio Reserve in Long Beach through May 20.
    
    Eight CALIFORNIA CONDORS were seen near Castaic along the Old Ridge Route on May 19.
    
    The DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER that wintered at Ladera Park was reported through May 20.
    
    The TROPICAL KINGBIRD at Entradero Park in Torrance continued around the pond through May 21.
     A SCISSOR-TAILED FYCATCHER was at the Piute Ponds on Edwards AFB from May 19-20 on the north side of Duckbill Lake.
    A NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH was at the south Ducks Unlimited Pond on May 20.
    A letter of permission is required for entry.
    
    A BANK SWALLOW was at the Ballona Freshwater Marsh (corner of Lincoln and Jefferson) near Playa Vista on May 21.
    
    A male SUMMER TANAGER was seen briefly at the LA County Natural History Museum Nature Gardens on May 23.
    
    San Clemente Island reported an OVENBIRD, a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER and BALTIMORE ORIOLE on May 23.
    
     - end transcript
    
    Jon L Fisher Glendale, CA JonF60@...
    
     EVENTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
    
    For all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website athttp://www.laaudubon.org
  2. -back to top-
  3. Re: [LACoBirds] LA Birding and Twitter LINK
    DATE: Mar 25, 2018 @ 11:07am, 61 day(s) ago
    Sent first tweet using #birdlax. I also used #birdlbc for long Beach.
    
    Happy birding
    Gabe Gartner & Brooke Keeney 
    Alondra Park 
    
    On Sun, Mar 25, 2018, 10:59 AM Gabriel Gartner < gartner.gabe@... > wrote:
    
    This is a great idea. We will start doing this.  My Twitter handle is @smcnaturalhistory
    
    Cheers,
    Gabe Gartner & Brooke Keeney 
    Alondra Park
    
    On Sat, Mar 24, 2018, 8:37 PM austin_sipes@... [LACoBirds] < LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Lately over on CALBIRDS ( https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/ groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/ topics/13544 ), there's been some discussion regarding the contemporary relevance of the Yahoo! Groups platform for conveying and confirming bird sightings. The Hon. Kimball Garrett was lamenting the lack of excitement and information regarding an unconfirmed Stellar's Eider sighting. Thankfully, there’s an almost perfect solution right under our beaks:  I’m talking about Twitter.
    
    I find it hard to understand why the LA birding community hasn’t yet flocked to Twitter as an indispensable reporting tool. Not only is  the app logo a freakin’ bird , it’s practically built for broadcasting bird sightings in real-time.
    
    Say I’m out birding at my local patch, Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica, and I come across a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. As always, I’ll record the sighting in my eBird iPhone app, but I should also send a tweet with information on the bird and its exact location, making sure to include the proper hashtags. This way, anyone who follows my birding account (@waldeninthecity) on Twitter will immediately see the sighting in their Twitter feed, and anyone who has mobile alerts turned on will get a notification about the tweet sent as a text.  Within seconds , information about the bird has gone out to anyone interested enough to click follow and/or set up mobile alerts, and anyone who wants to chase the STFL can hop in their car and head to the Westside.
    
    As a real-world example, the NYC birding community makes great use of Twitter’s capabilities. The community has settled on using the hashtags #birdcp (for Central Park) and #birdbk (for Brooklyn), and someone created @birdcentralpark and @birdbrklyn accounts to aggregate any tweets that include those hashtags. All one needs to do is follow those two accounts, and they’ll see any tweet containing the appropriate hashtag. Today alone, there have been at least 12 local Brooklyn alerts sent via the @birdbrklyn account. Wouldn’t it be great to have such real-time access to LA County bird sightings! By following these accounts along with the fair number of active local NYC birders who tweet their sightings, NYC birders have a bird-finding supertool in their pockets all day long.
    
    For this to work in LA, we need to agree on a relevant set of hashtags for reporting sightings. I suggest we follow the lead of our East Coast counterparts and go with  #birdlax  as the blanket LA County tag, and then various more specific tags if desired (#birdsamo, #birdpasadena, #birdmalibu, #birdsfv, etc.) As long as the blanket #birdlax tag is included, the tweet will get to the birding community at-large.
    
    I, for one, would like a more streamlined way to find out about local bird sightings, and I think Twitter has the potential to make LA birding even more accessible for those of us who want real-time info on what birds are in the area.
    
    Austin Sipes
    Santa Monica, CA
    @waldeninthecity
  4. -back to top-
  5. Re: [LACoBirds] LA Birding and Twitter LINK
    DATE: Mar 25, 2018 @ 10:59am, 61 day(s) ago
    This is a great idea. We will start doing this.  My Twitter handle is @smcnaturalhistory
    
    Cheers,
    Gabe Gartner & Brooke Keeney 
    Alondra Park
    
    On Sat, Mar 24, 2018, 8:37 PM austin_sipes@... [LACoBirds] < LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Lately over on CALBIRDS ( https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/ groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/ topics/13544 ), there's been some discussion regarding the contemporary relevance of the Yahoo! Groups platform for conveying and confirming bird sightings. The Hon. Kimball Garrett was lamenting the lack of excitement and information regarding an unconfirmed Stellar's Eider sighting. Thankfully, there’s an almost perfect solution right under our beaks:  I’m talking about Twitter.
    
    I find it hard to understand why the LA birding community hasn’t yet flocked to Twitter as an indispensable reporting tool. Not only is  the app logo a freakin’ bird , it’s practically built for broadcasting bird sightings in real-time.
    
    Say I’m out birding at my local patch, Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica, and I come across a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. As always, I’ll record the sighting in my eBird iPhone app, but I should also send a tweet with information on the bird and its exact location, making sure to include the proper hashtags. This way, anyone who follows my birding account (@waldeninthecity) on Twitter will immediately see the sighting in their Twitter feed, and anyone who has mobile alerts turned on will get a notification about the tweet sent as a text.  Within seconds , information about the bird has gone out to anyone interested enough to click follow and/or set up mobile alerts, and anyone who wants to chase the STFL can hop in their car and head to the Westside.
    
    As a real-world example, the NYC birding community makes great use of Twitter’s capabilities. The community has settled on using the hashtags #birdcp (for Central Park) and #birdbk (for Brooklyn), and someone created @birdcentralpark and @birdbrklyn accounts to aggregate any tweets that include those hashtags. All one needs to do is follow those two accounts, and they’ll see any tweet containing the appropriate hashtag. Today alone, there have been at least 12 local Brooklyn alerts sent via the @birdbrklyn account. Wouldn’t it be great to have such real-time access to LA County bird sightings! By following these accounts along with the fair number of active local NYC birders who tweet their sightings, NYC birders have a bird-finding supertool in their pockets all day long.
    
    For this to work in LA, we need to agree on a relevant set of hashtags for reporting sightings. I suggest we follow the lead of our East Coast counterparts and go with  #birdlax  as the blanket LA County tag, and then various more specific tags if desired (#birdsamo, #birdpasadena, #birdmalibu, #birdsfv, etc.) As long as the blanket #birdlax tag is included, the tweet will get to the birding community at-large.
    
    I, for one, would like a more streamlined way to find out about local bird sightings, and I think Twitter has the potential to make LA birding even more accessible for those of us who want real-time info on what birds are in the area.
    
    Austin Sipes
    Santa Monica, CA
    @waldeninthecity
  6. -back to top-
  7. Re: [LACoBirds] LA Birding and Twitter LINK
    DATE: Mar 24, 2018 @ 9:35pm, 62 day(s) ago
    1. I'm not going to put the effort into counting, by I bet your post here on an email list was well over the new 280 character limit of Twitter.
    
    2. I closed my Twitter account a few days after November 8, 2016.
    
    3. When I had a Twitter account, l "followed" Metrolink, and other accounts relevant to my job, and they never put out info in a timely manner that was supposedly the whole point of Twitter.
    
    4. The same folks who didn't inform this Los Angeles County email list today that the Sabine's Gull was still at the Piute Ponds aren't going to put out a tweet.
    
    5. In the last few weeks, two of the Yahoo groups moved to ".io" I have been under the assumption that Dan Cooper would make such an announcement that this list would be moving there, too.
    
    6. I have lots of friends who are older than me who are on social media (Personally, I have been thinking about closing my Facebook account), so I don't think it's necessarily a situation where old people who aren't tech savvy aren't on social media while young
    people are leaving the rest of us behind. Those of us older than 25 have jobs that keep us busy, and don't want i.e. can't spend our time on our smart phones going back and forth from our work emails to our personal emails to our Facebook to our Twitter to
    our Instagram to our Tumblr to our Snapchat.
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    
    Claremont, CA 91711
    
    cell one: 909.241.3300
    
    cell two: 213.471.6001
    
    home: 909.445.1456
    
    office: 213.351.7382
    
    office main 213.351.7897
    
    www.tgmiko.com
    
    From: austin_sipes@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Saturday, March 24, 8:37 PM
    
    Subject: [LACoBirds] LA Birding and Twitter
    
    To: lacobirds@yahoogroups.com
    
    
    
    Lately over on CALBIRDS ( https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/ groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/ topics/13544 ), there's been some discussion regarding the contemporary
    relevance of the Yahoo! Groups platform for conveying and confirming bird sightings. The Hon. Kimball Garrett was lamenting the lack of excitement and information regarding an unconfirmed Stellar's Eider sighting. Thankfully, there’s an almost perfect solution
    right under our beaks:I’m talking about Twitter.
    
    I find it hard to understand why the LA birding community hasn’t yet flocked to Twitter as an indispensable reporting tool. Not only isthe app logo a freakin’ bird, it’s practically built for broadcasting bird sightings in real-time.
    
    Say I’m out birding at my local patch, Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica, and I come across a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. As always, I’ll record the sighting in my eBird iPhone app, but I should also send a tweet with information on the bird and its exact location,
    making sure to include the proper hashtags. This way, anyone who follows my birding account (@waldeninthecity) on Twitter will immediately see the sighting in their Twitter feed, and anyone who has mobile alerts turned on will get a notification about the
    tweet sent as a text.Within seconds, information about the bird has gone out to anyone interested enough to click follow and/or set up mobile alerts, and anyone who wants to chase the STFL can hop intheir car and head to the Westside.
    
    As a real-world example, the NYC birding community makes great use of Twitter’s capabilities. The community has settled on using the hashtags #birdcp (for Central Park) and #birdbk (for Brooklyn), and someone created @birdcentralpark and @birdbrklyn accounts
    to aggregate any tweets that include those hashtags. All one needs to do is follow those two accounts, and they’ll see any tweet containing the appropriate hashtag. Today alone, there have been at least 12 local Brooklynalerts sent via the @birdbrklyn account.
    Wouldn’t it be great to have such real-time access to LA County bird sightings! By following these accounts along with the fair number of active local NYC birders who tweet their sightings, NYC birders have a bird-findingsupertool in their pockets all day
    long.
    
    For this to work in LA, we need to agree on a relevant set of hashtags for reporting sightings. I suggest we follow the lead of our East Coast counterparts and go with#birdlaxas the blanket LA County tag, and then various more specific tags if desired (#birdsamo,
    #birdpasadena, #birdmalibu, #birdsfv, etc.) As long as the blanket #birdlax tag is included, the tweet will get to the birding community at-large.
    
    I, for one, would like a more streamlined way to find out about local bird sightings, and I think Twitter has the potential to make LA birding even more accessible for those of us who want real-time info on what birds are in the area.
    
    Austin Sipes
    
    Santa Monica, CA
    
    @waldeninthecity
  8. -back to top-
  9. LA Birding and Twitter LINK
    DATE: Mar 24, 2018 @ 8:28pm, 62 day(s) ago
    Lately over on CALBIRDS ( https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/ groups/CALBIRDS/conversations/ topics/13544 ), there's been some discussion regarding the contemporary relevance of the Yahoo! Groups platform for conveying and confirming bird sightings. The Hon. Kimball Garrett was lamenting the lack of excitement and information regarding an unconfirmed Stellar's Eider sighting. Thankfully, there’s an almost perfect solution right under our beaks: I’m talking about Twitter.
    
    I find it hard to understand why the LA birding community hasn’t yet flocked to Twitter as an indispensable reporting tool. Not only is the app logo a freakin’ bird , it’s practically built for broadcasting bird sightings in real-time.
    
    Say I’m out birding at my local patch, Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica, and I come across a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. As always, I’ll record the sighting in my eBird iPhone app, but I should also send a tweet with information on the bird and its exact location, making sure to include the proper hashtags. This way, anyone who follows my birding account (@waldeninthecity) on Twitter will immediately see the sighting in their Twitter feed, and anyone who has mobile alerts turned on will get a notification about the tweet sent as a text. Within seconds , information about the bird has gone out to anyone interested enough to click follow and/or set up mobile alerts, and anyone who wants to chase the STFL can hop intheir car and head to the Westside.
    
    As a real-world example, the NYC birding community makes great use of Twitter’s capabilities. The community has settled on using the hashtags #birdcp (for Central Park) and #birdbk (for Brooklyn), and someone created @birdcentralpark and @birdbrklyn accounts to aggregate any tweets that include those hashtags. All one needs to do is follow those two accounts, and they’ll see any tweet containing the appropriate hashtag. Today alone, there have been at least 12 local Brooklynalerts sent via the @birdbrklyn account. Wouldn’t it be great to have such real-time access to LA County bird sightings! By following these accounts along with the fair number of active local NYC birders who tweet their sightings, NYC birders have a bird-findingsupertool in their pockets all day long.
    
    For this to work in LA, we need to agree on a relevant set of hashtags for reporting sightings. I suggest we follow the lead of our East Coast counterparts and go with #birdlaxas the blanket LA County tag, and then various more specific tags if desired (#birdsamo, #birdpasadena, #birdmalibu, #birdsfv, etc.) As long as the blanket #birdlax tag is included, the tweet will get to the birding community at-large.
    
    I, for one, would like a more streamlined way to find out about local bird sightings, and I think Twitter has the potential to make LA birding even more accessible for those of us who want real-time info on what birds are in the area.
    
    Austin Sipes
    Santa Monica, CA
    @waldeninthecity
  10. -back to top-
  11. Los Angeles RBA- 19 January 2018 LINK
    DATE: Jan 19, 2018 @ 1:36pm, 4 month(s) ago
    - RBA * California * Los Angeles RBA *January 19, 2018 * CALA1801.19
    
     -Birds mentioned
    
    Cackling Goose Tundra Swan “Eurasian” Green-winged Teal Red-necked Grebe Common Ground-Dove Pacific Golden-Plover Lesser Black-backed Gull SLATY-BACKED GULL Glaucous Gull Yellow-crowned Night-Heron Zone-tailed Hawk Williamson’s Sapsucker Northern “Yellow-shafted” Flicker Pacific-slope Flycatcher Eastern Phoebe Dusky-capped Flycatcher Ash-throated Flycatcher Tropical Kingbird Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Bell’s Vireo Cassin’s Vireo Sage Thrasher “Red” Fox Sparrow Swamp Sparrow White-throated Sparrow RUSTY BLACKBIRD Black-and-white Warbler American Redstart Northern Parula Magnolia Warbler Palm Warbler Pine Warbler Painted Redstart Hooded Oriole
    
     California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate on the rare bird report form):
    
    http://www.californiabirds.org/
    
     Enter your bird sightings on eBird:
    
    http://ebird.org/content/ebird
    
     Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher at
    
    JonF60@... Coverage: Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted
    
     -Transcript
    
    This is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for January 19.
    
    The TUNDRA SWAN at the Piute Ponds (on the Ducks Unlimited Pond) on Edwards AFB continued through January 18. Remember that a letter of permission is required for entry.
    
    The“EURASIAN” GREEN-WINGED TEALalong the LA River adjacent to the Bette Davis Picnic Area in Glendale continued through January 14.
    
    A COMMON GROUND-DOVE was at the usual spot along the San Gabriel River in Bellflower at the east end of Trabuco Street on January 11.
    
    The RED-NECKED GREBE at Castaic Lagoon was reported through January 18.
    
    A continuing PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER was at Dockweiler State Beach in El Segundo through January 16, generally north of the Snowy Plover enclosure.
    
    A SLATY-BACKED GULL was again seen at the San Gabriel Coastal Basin Spreading Grounds in Pico Rivera on January 13. A first cycle LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was seen on January 15 and 17.
    The basins are west of the river between Whittier and Washington (easy access is at the east end of Mines Ave. east of Passons Blvd.). Late morning or afternoon
    generally seems to be better for gulls here.
    
    Another LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, presumably the same adult bird previously seen at the San Gabriel Coastal Basin
    Spreading Grounds, was at the Rio Hondo basins (at the opposite- west- end of Mines Ave.) on January 17. Also at the Rio Hondo basins (visible from Canford St.) was a first cycle GLAUCOUS GULL from January 17-19
     An immature YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON was at Topanga Beach Lagoon from January 14-17.
    
    A probable ZONE-TAILED HAWK was over the Verdugo Hills (seen from Beaudry North Motorway) on January 13.
    
    A PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER was in the northeast corner of Hopkins Wilderness Park in Redondo Beach on January 11.
    
    The EASTERN PHOEBE at Madrona Marsh inTorrance was reported through January 18 near the "Chevron corner" (the area of the preserve opposite the Chevrongas station, corner of Sepulveda
    and Madrona). An ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER and a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER alsocontinued here through January 17. A NORTHERN “YELLOW-SHAFTED” FLICKER was at Madrona on January 12 and a TROPICAL KINGBIRD was in the southwest portion of the preserve from January
    17-18. Official Preserve hours are 10-5 Tuesday through Sunday.
    
    The DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER continued at Ladera Park in Ladera Heights through January 18.It moves around the park but seems to favor the east side. A HOODED ORIOLE was at the northwest
    corner of Ladera Park on January 12.
    Another DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER continued at Runnymeade Park in Winnetka through January 17 (between the tennis courts and playground). Also continuing here was a PINE WARBLER north of the
    playground and around the blue water fountain also through January 17.
    
    An ASH-THROATED FYCATCHER was at Odd Fellows Cemetery in Los Angeles on January 13.
    
    The SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER along the lower LA River in Long Beach was present through January 15. Check West 21 st Street (especially around street number 850-851) near San
    Francisco Avenue and in this general area from here to the river.
    
    Another SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER was at a residence in Westchester on January 18.
    
    A CASSIN’S VIREO was along the West San Gabriel River Parkway Nature Trail in Lakewood on January 16 in cottonwoods near tower 35.
    
    A SAGE THRASHER continued in Wilmington through January 18, it has been seen northwest of the corner of Anchorage and Shore Roads and most recently along Peninsula Road, northwest of Anchorage.
    Google Earth coordinates for the exact spot are 33.76518, -118.24874.
    
    Continuing Bonelli Regional Park in San Dimas was a SWAMP SPARROW on the north side of the lake through January 12. It is being seen near the small (usually dry) pond east of the small green
    pier. Near here (on the north edge of the eucalyptus lined square parking lot) a “RED” FOX SPARROW was found on January 13.
     Also continuing at Bonelli was an AMERICAN REDSTART and NORTHERN PARULA. These birds are near the extreme northeast part of the lake accessed from the “jungle trail”. They are usually seen
    in an oak and an ash tree along the eastern edge of the lake inflow channel. In this vicinity is a continuing PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER.
    
    WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS continued at Montrose Community Park along the fence line above the ball fields through January 16 and south and east of the Old Zoo area at Griffith Park through
    January 18.
    
    The RUSTY BLACKBIRD continued around the lower pond at Almansor Park in Alhambra through January 17. A CACKLING GOOSE is present as well.
    
    A female type AMERICAN REDSTART was at Wilderness Park in Downey from January 15-18. It was in a Brazilian Pepper tree northwest of the park building.
    
    A PALM WARBLER was at Entradero Park in Torrance from January 15-17 by the edge of the pond.
     Continuing through January 11 at Peck Road Water Conservation Park in Arcadia were aBLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, NORTHERN PARULA and a MAGNOLIA WARBLER. Check the area around the inflow channel
    at the north end of the north lake. After being missed for a number of days the BELL’S VIREO was seen in the same area on January 15.
     The PAINTED REDSTART at Culver City Park continued throughJanuary 15. Its usual spot is between Botts Field and the Culver Little League Field.
    
    At Veteran’s Park in Sylmar, the SUMMER TANAGER was seen through January 14 and a WILLIAMSON’S SAPSUCKER was in pines below the road lined with olive trees through January 18.
    
     - end transcript
    
    Jon L Fisher Glendale, CA JonF60@...
    
     EVENTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
    
    For all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website at
    
    http://www.laaudubon.org
  12. -back to top-
  13. Los Angeles RBA- 11 January 2018 LINK
    DATE: Jan 11, 2018 @ 4:07pm, 4 month(s) ago
    - RBA * California * Los Angeles RBA *January 11, 2018 * CALA1801.11
    
     -Birds mentioned
    
    Tundra Swan “Eurasian” Green-winged Teal Pacific Golden-Plover SLATY-BACKED GULL Glaucous Gull Brown Booby Neotropic Cormorant Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Northern “Yellow-shafted” Flicker Eastern Phoebe Vermilion Flycatcher Dusky-capped Flycatcher Ash-throated Flycatcher Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Sage Thrasher Green-tailed Towhee Swamp Sparrow White-throated Sparrow Scott’s Oriole RUSTY BLACKBIRD Ovenbird Black-and-white Warbler American Redstart Northern Parula Magnolia Warbler Palm Warbler Pine Warbler Painted Redstart Black-headed Grosbeak
    
    
    
    California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate on the rare bird report form):
    
    http://www.californiabirds.org/
    
     Enter your bird sightings on eBird:
    
    http://ebird.org/content/ebird
    
     Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher at
    
    JonF60@... Coverage: Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted
    
     -Transcript
    
    This is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for January 11.
    
    The TUNDRA SWAN at the Piute Ponds (on the Ducks Unlimited Pond) on Edwards AFB continued through January 8. Remember that a letter of permission is required
    for entry.
    
    The“EURASIAN” GREEN-WINGED TEALalong the LA River adjacent to the Bette Davis Picnic Area in Glendale continued through January 10. Likewise did another at the San Gabriel Coastal Basin
    Spreading Grounds in Pico Rivera through January 8.
    
    A continuing PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER was at Dockweiler State Beach in El Segundo through January 10, generally north of the Snowy Plover enclosure.
    
    A SLATY-BACKED GULL was at the San Gabriel Coastal Basin Spreading Grounds in Pico Rivera on January 6. It was seen at the north end of the south basin. The basins are west of the river
    between Whittier and Washington (easy access is at the east end of Mines Ave. east of Passons Blvd.). A GLAUCOUS GULL was here on January 5.
    
    Two BROWN BOOBIES were observed off Manhattan Beach on January 7.
    
    Continuing at Peck Road Water Conservation Park in Arcadia was a NEOTROPIC CORMORANT (usually seen on the island at the north end of the north lake) through January 10. In the willows at
    the north end of the north lake (mainly in the area west of the inflow channel) was a continuingBLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER through January 7 and NORTHERN PARULA and a MAGNOLIA WARBLER both present through January 10.
     A continuing YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was at Legg Lake in South El Monte on January 7. It was seen west of restroom 8.
    
    A NORTHERN “YELLOW-SHAFTED” FLICKER was at Mountain View Cemetery on January 7.
    
    The EASTERN PHOEBE at Madrona Marsh inTorrance was reported through January 9 near the "Chevron corner" (the area of the preserve opposite the Chevrongas station, corner of Sepulveda and
    Madrona). An ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER and a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER alsocontinued at the marsh. Official Preserve hours are 10-5 Tuesday through Sunday.
    
    VERMILION FLYCATCHERS were at Castaic Lagoon through January 7 (a male at the north end of the beach near the north end of the lagoon) and at the Castaic Sports Complex (three birds continuing
    by the athletic fields) through January 6. Another female was in the northern part of the West San Gabriel River Nature Trail in Lakewood on January 5 and four continued at Oakdale Memorial Park in Glendora.
     The DUSKY-CAPPED FLYCATCHER continued on the east side of Ladera Park in Ladera Heights through January 10. Another continued at Runnymeade Park in Winnetka through January 7 (south of the
    playground).
    
    A SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER was found along the lower LA River in Long Beach on January 6. Check West 21 st Street (especially around street number 850-851) near San Francisco
    Avenue and in this general area from here to the river. The bird was reported through January 11.
    
    A SAGE THRASHER continued in Wilmington through January 7, northwest of the corner of Anchorage and Shore Roads. Also present here was a PALM WARBLER on January 6.
    
    Another SAGE THRASHER was at Augustus Hawkins Natural Park in south-central Los Angeles on January 10.
    
    A continuing GREEN-TAILED TOWHEE was at the Huntington Gardens in San Marino through January 5 in the parking lot near the main entrance.
    
    Continuing Bonelli Regional Park in San Dimas was a SWAMP SPARROW on the north side of the lake. It was last reported near the small dried pond east of the small green pier on January 10.
    An adult male SCOTT’S ORIOLE was west of restroom 2 in the northeast part of the park from January 6-8 (west of the white octagonal building near some green awnings).
     The WHITE-THROATED SPARROW continued in the Rose Garden at Decsanso Gardens in La Canada through January 6.
    
    The RUSTY BLACKBIRD continued around the lower pond at Almansor Park in Alhambra through January 10.
    
    Another RUSTY BLACKBIRD was found along the LA River adjacent to the Bette Davis Picnic Area in Glendale on January 10 near the confluence of the two channels by the west end of the park.
    It appears to move around the area however.
    
    The OVENBIRD at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont continued through January 7. It has been in a grove of oak trees in the area north of Indian Hill Mesa.
    
    Another BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER continued at El Segundo Library Park through January 6.
    
    The NORTHERN PARULA continued at Bonelli Regional Park in San Dimas through January 7 and the AMERICAN REDSTART was reported through January 10. They are near the extreme northeast part
    of the lake accessed from the “jungle trail”. They are usually seen in an oak and an ash tree along the eastern edge of the lake inflow channel.
    
    The PALM WARBLER continued at DeForest Park in Long Beach through January 8. It has been around the administration/restroom buildings near the north end of the park.
    
    A PINE WARBLER was found at Runnymeade Park in Winnetka on January 7. It was between the playground and tennis courts.
    
    The PAINTED REDSTART at Culver City Park continued through January 8. Its usual spot is between Botts Field and the Culver Little League Field.
    
    A wintering BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK continues in Sierra Madre, being last reported on January 10.
    
     - end transcript
    
    Jon L Fisher Glendale, CA JonF60@...
    
     EVENTS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
    
    For all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website at
    
    http://www.laaudubon.org
  14. -back to top-
  15. Re: [LACoBirds] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher LINK
    DATE: Jan 11, 2018 @ 2:43pm, 4 month(s) ago
    The scissor-tailed flycatcher is actively feeding on the red berries of the short but large (did I just describe myself) dense magnolia tree in front of 851 21st Street. Amazingly, the bird has been bullying kingbird's, shooing them away.
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    
    Claremont, CA 91711
    
    cell one: 909.241.3300
    
    cell two: 213.471.6001
    
    home: 909.445.1456
    
    office: 213.351.7382
    
    office main 213.351.7897
    
    www.tgmiko.com
    
    From: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Donna donnabray@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Monday, January 8, 2018 2:43:09 PM
    
    To: condor262001@...
    
    Cc: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: Re: [LACoBirds] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
    
     LA County Birders, Lindsay Fitch and I re-found this bird today about 1 pm.Location is still 21st St. between Golden and San Francisco Streets.Active, and it took some patience.Listen for the Kingbirds, that helped. Donna Bray
    Norwalk
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Jan 7, 2018, at 8:56 PM, condor262001@... [LACoBirds] < LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     I arrived (walking along the bike trail) around 1230 PM and was fortunate that someone had located it a few minutes before on 21st between San Francisco and Golden in Long Beach. He had it on the wires but quickly relocated it on the top of the second
    tree from Golden. For completeness, I provide a link to a photo when it was high up in the tree.
    
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/25876581@N00/25699658308/in/dateposted-public/
    
    Jim Hecht Hermosa Beach CA
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: [LACoBirds] Has anyone seen NeoTropic Cormorant at Peck Park lately? LINK
    DATE: Jan 11, 2018 @ 1:04pm, 4 month(s) ago
    I had it Monday, and other people have had it before and after and entered it into eBird. The bird can be in either set of rock islands in the North or South Lake. Many people reported it lately in the Northlake, and when I walked up to the north lake to look
    for the Warblers that are there, all the cormorants saw me, freaked out and flew away. What I went to the South Lake, I never found the bird and was refusing to leave until I look at every single cormorant three times over, and then the Neotropic stick its
    head out from behind a pile of rocks. Up Periscope. Down Periscope. Every once in awhile the bird would look up, look around and then pull his head back behind the pile of rocks and completely disappear. Soaking wet, I slogged back to the car, squeezed the
    water out of my hat, and went home.
    
    By the way I just parked my car here A Long Beach at the scissor-tailed flycatcher spot after driving around in the neighborhood in circles. I don't see any kingbird's of any stripe as of yet. Any Pearls of Wisdom would be gratefully accepted.
    
    Tom
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    
    Claremont, CA 91711
    
    cell one: 909.241.3300
    
    cell two: 213.471.6001
    
    home: 909.445.1456
    
    office: 213.351.7382
    
    office main 213.351.7897
    
    www.tgmiko.com
    
    From: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com on behalf of jdi4interests@... [LACoBirds]
    
    Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:51:01 AM
    
    To: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com
    
    Subject: [LACoBirds] Has anyone seen NeoTropic Cormorant at Peck Park lately
    
     Has anyone seen the Neotropic Cormorant at Peck Park lately Jan Wilson
  18. -back to top-
  19. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Monday - Alternate Location LINK
    DATE: Jan 8, 2018 @ 5:55pm, 5 month(s) ago
    Hi all.
    
    I found the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at 09:35 on Monday, a couple of blocks from the location where it has been reported recently. It was in a tall tree on the southeast corner of Oregon Ave. and W. 20th St. After a while it moved slowly from tree to tree northwards along Oregon until I lost it mid-block. 
    
    I was surprised to find at least two Phainopeplas in the area. I had multiple sightings, of both male and female type. 
    
    My checklist, with horrible record photos, is at  https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41746949  
    One of the photos shows the underside in flight with the tail pattern and the reddish armpits.
    
    Take care,
    
    Bernardo
  20. -back to top-
  21. Re: [LACoBirds] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher LINK
    DATE: Jan 8, 2018 @ 2:43pm, 5 month(s) ago
    LA County Birders, Lindsay Fitch and I re-found this bird today about 1 pm.Location is still 21st St. between Golden and San Francisco Streets.Active, and it took some patience.Listen for the Kingbirds, that helped. Donna Bray
    Norwalk
    
    Sent from my iPhone
    
    On Jan 7, 2018, at 8:56 PM, condor262001@... [LACoBirds] < LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
     I arrived (walking along the bike trail) around 1230 PM and was fortunate that someone had located it a few minutes before on 21st between San Francisco and Golden in Long Beach. He had it on the wires but quickly relocated it on the top of the second tree from Golden. For completeness, I provide a link to a photo when it was high up in the tree.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/25876581@N00/25699658308/in/dateposted-public/
    
    Jim Hecht Hermosa Beach CA
  22. -back to top-
  23. Palm Warbler Continues at DeForest Park (tennis courts) LINK
    DATE: Jan 8, 2018 @ 2:22pm, 5 month(s) ago
    For those chasing the Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher, the Palm Warbler continues at DeForest Park in the same spot. Checklist with directions. So far only light rain down here.
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41752424
    
    Merryl Edelstein Long Beach
  24. -back to top-
  25. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher LINK
    DATE: Jan 7, 2018 @ 8:56pm, 5 month(s) ago
    I arrived (walking along the bike trail) around 1230 PM and was fortunate that someone had located it a few minutes before on 21st between San Francisco and Golden in Long Beach. He had it on the wires but quickly relocated it on the top of the second tree from Golden. For completeness, I provide a link to a photo when it was high up in the tree.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/25876581@N00/25699658308/in/dateposted-public/
    
    Jim Hecht Hermosa Beach CA
  26. -back to top-
  27. Re: [LACoBirds] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Lower LA River LINK
    DATE: Jan 7, 2018 @ 12:39pm, 5 month(s) ago
    850 21th street in the treetops and wires.
    
    On Jan 7, 2018 11:13, "Mark Scheel scheel314@... [LACoBirds]" < LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Hi all,
    
    The scissor-tailed flycatcher is still in the same location, 11:10 am Jan 7.
    
    Mark and Janet Scheel 
    Pasadena
    
    On Jan 6, 2018 4:16 PM, " merryledel@... [LACoBirds]" < LACoBirds-noreply@ yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Birders, there is a Scissor-tailed flycatcher at the LA River below Willow Street. A local birder tipped of Becky Turley, who can't post to the list serve anymore.
    If you take DeForest south of Will to Hill, there is a set of stairs up to the river. Walk about half way south toward the PCH bridge (past 21st Street). . When you see a blue inflatable pool and white gazebo, just a few more houses south and on the edge of the river is a group of Willows. Approx GPS viewing spot 3.7941311,-118.2037272
    When last seen, the bird was moving from approx the largest of the willows to the lines over the neighborhood, with one of the numerous Cassin's Kingbirds. We had it for about 20-25 minutes  and lost it at about 3:20 pm, but it has been around for about a week.
    The Peregrine didn't help, nor did all four of us taking our eyes off of it at the same time!
    
    Merryl Edelstein Long BEach
  28. -back to top-
  29. Re: [LACoBirds] Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Lower LA River LINK
    DATE: Jan 7, 2018 @ 11:09am, 5 month(s) ago
    Hi all,
    
    The scissor-tailed flycatcher is still in the same location, 11:10 am Jan 7.
    
    Mark and Janet Scheel 
    Pasadena
    
    On Jan 6, 2018 4:16 PM, " merryledel@... [LACoBirds]" < LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com > wrote:
    
      Birders, there is a Scissor-tailed flycatcher at the LA River below Willow Street. A local birder tipped of Becky Turley, who can't post to the list serve anymore.
    If you take DeForest south of Will to Hill, there is a set of stairs up to the river. Walk about half way south toward the PCH bridge (past 21st Street). . When you see a blue inflatable pool and white gazebo, just a few more houses south and on the edge of the river is a group of Willows. Approx GPS viewing spot 3.7941311,-118.2037272
    When last seen, the bird was moving from approx the largest of the willows to the lines over the neighborhood, with one of the numerous Cassin's Kingbirds. We had it for about 20-25 minutes  and lost it at about 3:20 pm, but it has been around for about a week.
    The Peregrine didn't help, nor did all four of us taking our eyes off of it at the same time!
    
    Merryl Edelstein Long BEach
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.