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   Western Gull
Western Gull
Larus occidentalis


   Western Gull (Larus occidentalis) - WEGU (recent eBird sightings, view CBRC records, range map
)

  1. Montane and desert crows LINK
    DATE: Jan 31, 2018, 19 day(s) ago
    Birders, † Having vented about what seem to be far too many eBird reports of Western Gulls from the Antelope Valley, Iíve turned my attention (thank you Lance Benner for uncovering these) to an inordinate number of eBird entries of American Crows
    from above about 5,000 elevation in the higher San Gabriel Mtns. †As you all surely know, Common Ravens are common and widespread throughout the montane portions of the county, but American Crows are essentially absent from montane coniferous forests.† [There
    are certainly some exceptions outside of L. A. County, where there are park-like stands of conifers mixed with open areas, or residential areas within open montane forest Ė crows can occur in such situations.] † Iím sure that American Crows must occasionally move into or pass through lower elevation montane habitats, but the numerous eBird reports from places like Charlton Flat, Chilao, and up through Cloudburst Summit, Buckhorn Flat, Grassy Hollow,
    etc. are cause (caws) for concern. Iím certainly not saying that all such reports are incorrect, but rather that none of them include documentation (in part because eBird doesnít flag them as rare), and it seems highly likely that observers not conversant
    in status and distribution just assume that crows are everywhere.† So if you have personal reports of American Crows from montane localities in L. A. County, please add documentation to your eBird lists if available, or consider removing crows from your lists
    if youíre uncertain of the basis for their inclusion. † Then thereís the Antelope ValleyÖ.† †Common Ravens are, of course, probably more abundant in the Antelope Valley than almost any other area in North America. †Crows, on the other hand, are relatively recent colonists in the Antelope Valley
    and largely restricted to urban areas with lots of trees (e.g. Palmdale, Lancaster, Quartz Hill). ††Yet eBird contains reports of American Crows, sometimes in double figures or even dozens, at localities scattered throughout the Antelope Valley, well away
    from towns. †A few of these have some brief notes, suggesting the observers were aware that the record was unusual; but the vast majority have no details at all.† So, again, please reconsider your personal eBird entries of American Crows from the non-urban
    portions of the Antelope Valley and provide documentation if available or purging uncertain reports. † So the new challenge is to document any future American Crows from the San Gabriel Mtns. and desert areas of the Antelope Valley with identifiable photos and/or recordings! † And another reminder:† the arbiter of status and distribution is NOT whether eBird filters flag an entry Ė L. A. County is simply too complex for fine-scale filters that accurately reflect distributional quirks. Basic references will tell
    you that crows are generally absent from the deserts and mountains, so birders in those areas should be aware that sightings need documentation. † And one last lament.† A Venn diagram would show that the sets of all eBird users in L. A. County and all subscribers to LACoBirds are overlapping, but far from congruent. Though you might disagree after reading my rants, I think the local
    list serves are a great resource for educating eBird users. But the problem is a large number of eBird users do not read list serve postings (in fact, it seems a large number of them arenít even birders).† So the challenges of getting information out there
    to eBird users remain daunting. † Kimball † Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
  2. -back to top-
  3. Antelope Valley Western Gull challenge LINK
    DATE: Jan 30, 2018, 20 day(s) ago
    OK, so my winter Rufous Hummingbird challenge (see message #19797) has not resulted in any photo-documented winter reports, so Iíll set that aside for another year (spring migrant Rufous should start showing up in the next week or two).†
    †Iím now switching gears to another pet peeve Ė the several dozen (!) eBird entries for Western Gull in the Antelope Valley.†
    Some of the reports include 10-15 individuals, and the reports span a large area from Quail Lake to Apollo Park to Piute Ponds, and south to Lake Palmdale. †And, yet, written details are provided for only TWO of these reports, and
    in only one case do the details approach being adequate to document the occurrence. †It appears that nobody has ever photographed a Western Gull in the Antelope Valley (or at least no photo has ended up in eBird).†
    † So what is the status of Western Gull in the Antelope Valley† I suppose Iím influenced by the fact that Iíve birded the Antelope Valley and its various lakes multiple times a year for about 40 years, and Iíve never seen a Western Gull
    there.† This is actually surprising, since the species can be numerous as close as Castaic Lake/Lagoon (only about 15 miles SW of the southern flank of the Antelope Valley), and it has obviously spread well into coastal slope valleys (San Fernando, San Gabriel).†
    But it is clearly a real phenomenon that this primarily coastal species does not make it with any regularity to the deserts (away from the Salton Sea). While itís highly likely that some of the Antelope Valley reports are valid (there are some well-known birder
    names attached to some of the eBird entries), I will wager that the vast majority of the reports stem from a failure to be aware of status and distribution, leading to the misidentification of a big, dark young Herring Gull or a seemingly dark gray-backed
    adult California Gull as a Western Gull. If Western Gulls reach the Antelope Valley as often as eBird says it does, then I am confident that one of you will actually get an identifiable photograph one of these days.† In the meantime, please review your own
    Western Gull reports from the Antelope Valley (if this applies to you) and see if you have some kind of documentation that can be added to your eBird entry; alternatively, consider deleting your Western Gull entries if youíre not certain, in retrospect, that
    you were correct. † I fear that this is a case where eBirders see a proliferation of Western Gull eBird reports from the Antelope Valley and assume the species is not unusual there. But these reports have not been vetted. More finely-tuned eBird filters would
    help greatly with this problem (such filters are in the works, and the filter limit for Western Gull on the deserts will certainly be set at zero), but in the meantime please donít take apparent status and distribution in eBird as gospel! † Other species common on the coastal slope but rare and local in (or largely absent from) the Antelope Valley include American Crow (though increasing in Lancaster/Palmdale urban areas), Cassinís Kingbird, Allenís Hummingbird, Huttonís Vireo,
    Western Bluebird and Purple Finch. There are plenty of eBird reports of those species as well, and many are likely not valid. † And I could go on and on (and will, one of these days) about the opposite problem of coastal slope entries for desert species such as LeConteís Thrasher, Ladder-backed Woodpecker, and Verdin.† Many thanks to those who spend time with the
    eBird database to ferret out such questionable entries, and I would single out Lance Benner for his exceptional work in this regard. † Now go photograph that desert Western Gull! † Kimball † Kimball L. Garrett Ornithology Collections Manager Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County 900 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA (213) 763-3368 kgarrett@... http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
  4. -back to top-
  5. Jaegers at Ballona Creek yesterday afternoon LINK
    DATE: Dec 26, 2017 @ 7:53pm, 54 day(s) ago
    I took a walk at Ballona Creek yesterday (12/25) in the late afternoon.
    
    I walked up the north jetty to the UCLA boat ramp. The typical
    
    rockpipers were present (Willet, Marbled Godwit, and Black-bellied
    
    Plover) in good numbers, but nothing out of the ordinary. I then walked
    
    back down to the Pacific bridge and out onto the outer jetty to where
    
    the pavement portion ends. As I started back upstream toward the
    
    Pacific bridge, I heard some commotion and saw a sub-adult jaeger
    
    chasing a tern right down the middle of the creek. They crossed over to
    
    the marina channel and continued out to sea. While I expect the jaeger
    
    was a Parasitic, I'm not all that good with sub-adult jaegers, so I
    
    won't swear to the ID.
    
    After that excitement, I walked over to the south side of the creek and
    
    walked out toward the ocean. Had one Surfbird that was missing a foot
    
    and a few Black Turnstones. As I returned to the shoreline, another
    
    jaeger flew along the beach chasing gulls. This bird was an adult or
    
    nearly so and I'm comfortable calling this one a Parasitic. I've never
    
    encountered any jaegers before on any of my many walks at Ballona over
    
    the years, so two of them made for a memorable afternoon.
    
    The lighting late in the day was spectacular, providing some very pretty
    
    photo ops. I put a photo of the Parasitic Jaeger, a humorous shot of a
    
    Great Blue Heron, and a nicely lit shot of one of the Black Turnstones
    
    on my website (address below.) They're the first shots on the "Recent"
    
    tab.
    
    Here's a complete list for the walk:
    
    Surf Scoter  2
    
    Bufflehead  4
    
    Horned Grebe  1
    
    Western Grebe  6
    
    Rock Pigeon  
    
    Black-bellied Plover 100
    
    Marbled Godwit  40
    
    Black Turnstone  3
    
    Surfbird  1
    
    Least Sandpiper  30
    
    Western Sandpiper 12
    
    Willet   300
    
    Parasitic Jaeger 1
    
    Heermann's Gull  1 Adult
    
    Ring-billed Gull  
    
    Western Gull  
    
    California Gull  
    
    Herring Gull  1 Second cycle
    
    Red-throated Loon 1
    
    Common Loon  1
    
    Double-crested Cormorant 10
    
    Brown Pelican  
    
    Great Blue Heron 1
    
    American Crow  10
    
    House Sparrow  
    
    House Finch  
    
    Savannah Sparrow 1
    
    Martin
    
    ---------------
    
    Martin Meyers
    
    email: Martin (...AT...) SierraBirdbum.com
    
    Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
    
    Truckee, CA
  6. -back to top-
  7. Malibu today LINK
    DATE: Nov 17, 2017 @ 3:39pm, 3 month(s) ago
    Today I visited Malibu Lagoon. About noon-thirty I found a Pacific Golden Plover on the ocean shore of the lagoon, near the east end of the massive gull flock, in company with several Black-bellied and one Snowy Plover. It was just sitting on the sane a couple of feet from the lagoon water. Noted was the brownish dorsal feathers with buffy/gold interspersed. The "eyebrow" was quite indistinct and appeared buffy. Its bill was on the bulky side, less than the BB Plover and shorter. I could not determine the wing projection length or number of feathers involved. For no reason, not my fault, it stood and immediately flew west along the lagoon edge, not to be found again. There was no white rump, but I could not determine much of the wing, underwing pattern or leg length, as it abruptly rose and flew into the sun. It has been several years since I've seen this species in theLagoon area.
    
    There were primarily California and Western Gulls, with one Herring, a Ring-billed and a handful of Herrmann's Gulls, several Royal Terns and a Forster's Tern cruising back and forth over the Lagoon. Among the dozen or so Western Grebes was a Clark's Grebe.
    
    Birdingly,
    
    Irwin Woldman
    Studio City
  8. -back to top-
  9. Upcoming 1st time Trip October 6th-8th Advice LINK
    DATE: Aug 20, 2017 @ 5:16pm, 6 month(s) ago
    Hello everyone! My wife are doing a road-trip this October. We are starting in LA through Arizona, up through Utah to Las Vegas toward Mammoth Lakes and a few days in SF. We have 144 target species for the whole trip but narrowed down a list for birds more common or only in California. We will be in LA October 6-8th. Speed birding is more like it.†. I am trying to basically weed out birds from my list that most likely I will encounter with little to no effort in this date range so I can focus squarely on the other target birds. I have done that with a handful. Local common knowledge is priceless so I would appreciate it. Lots of books talk mostly of breeding birds or wintering. I am on the fringe of migration it seems. If anyone is interested in helping please email me off list. I also realize that some are pretty local, rare or just sporadic. We will be staying in Hollywood. †
    
    My cali list (keep in mind ill be going through Yosemite†and SF so species reflect that.
    
    Mountain Quail Pink-footed Shearwater Blue-footed Booby Brandt's Cormorant Pelagic Cormorant California Condor White-tailed Kite Ridgway's Rail Black Oystercatcher Long-billed Curlew Black Turnstone Heermann's Gull Western Gull Glaucous-winged Gull Elegant Tern Band-tailed Pigeon Spotted Owl Common Poorwell Lewis's Woodpecker Red-breasted Sapsucker White-headed Woodpecker Red-crowned Parrot Steller's Jay California Scrub-Jay Black-billed Magpie Yellow-billed Magpie Clark's Nutcracker Mountan Chickadee Chestnut-backed Chickadee Oak Titmouse Bushtit Pygmy Nuthatch Pacific Wren Bewick's Wren California Gnatcatcher American Dipper Wrentit Western Bluebird California Thrasher Bell's Sparrow Tricolored Blackbird Brewer's Blackird Great-tailed Grackle Northern Red Bishop Scaly-breasted Munia
    
    Birds that can be in CA or AZ
    Golden Eagle Swainson's Hawk Ferruginous Hawk Ruddy-Ground Dove Greater Roadrunner Western Screech-Owl Northern Pygmy-Owl Burrowing Owl Spotted Owl Common Poorwell Vaux's Swift White-throated Swift Costa's Hummingbird Red-naped Sapsucker Prairie Falcon Western Wood-Pewee Pacific-slope Flycatcher Hutton's Vireo Cassin's Vireo Plumbeous Vireo Pinyon Jay Violet-green Swallow Canyon Wren Hermit Warbler Sagebrush Sparrow Rufous-crowned Sparrow Black-headed Grosbeak Lazuli Bunting Hooded Oriole Lawrence's Goldfinch
    
    Justin Lawson
    Worcester, Ma
    My Wildlife Photos/Videos
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/justinlawson/
    
    justindlawson AT gmail.com
  10. -back to top-
  11. Re: [LACoBirds] Any juvenile Heermann's Gulls? LINK
    DATE: Jul 20, 2017 @ 2:42pm, 7 month(s) ago
    Later yesterday afternoon (Jul 19, 6:45pm), there turned out to be 10
    juvenile Heermann's Gulls (amongst 86 adults; there had been 93 adults
    earlier), 77 Western Gulls, California Gulls (there had been 6 earlier),
    and 1 adult Ring-billed Gull, all vigorously feeding at the fresh kelp
    deposit on the outer beach. There were still some gulls feeding even at
    8:10pm (36 Western and 4 adult Heermann's).
    
    I was curious where other juvenile Heermann's Gulls have been showing up,
    so I searched June-July 2017 on eBird throughout California:
    
    ("juvenile" below is defined to mean fresh
    juvenile, hatch year with scaly plumage
    
    that's why some have a question
    mark; some assumptions are made, otherwise many more would have question
    marks)
    
    Emory Cove & mudflats, San Diego County
    
    Jul 09: 1
    juvenile
    
    Mission Bay--Quivira Basin, San Diego County
    
    Jul 14: 1
    juvenile
    
    Off Mission Bay (offshore species only), San Diego County
    
    Jul 14: 1
    juvenile
    
    Point La Jolla--seawatch, San Diego County
    
    Jul 01: 1
    juvenile
    
    Jul 19: 1
    juvenile
    
    Oceanside Waterfront, San Diego County
    
    Jul 05: 2
    juveniles
    
    Dana Point Harbor, Orange County
    
    Jul 01: 1
    juvenile, a few 2nd-year
    
    Jul 08: 3
    juveniles, 2-4 2nd-winter
    
    Jul 16: 6-7
    juveniles, 1 2nd-year
    
    Jul 18: 3
    juvenile, 3-5 2nd-year
    
    San Clemente Island--China Pt., Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 03: 1
    juvenile
    
    Cabrillo Beach, Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 11: 1 juvenile
    
    Jul 17: 3 juveniles
    
    Jul 19: 10 juveniles
    
    Terranea Blufftop Park - Seawatch, Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 09: 3
    juveniles
    
    Jul 16: 1
    immature ("dark overall"
    
    I guess it could be anything
    from 1st- to 3rd-year, but probably 2nd or 3rd)
    
    Torrance Beach, Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 08: 4
    juveniles
    
    Malibu Lagoon, Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 01: 1
    juvenile
    
    Jul 14: 1
    juvenile
    
    Jul 19: 5-10
    juveniles
    
    Pt. Dume, Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 09: 3
    juveniles, 1 2nd-year
    
    Zuma Beach and Lagoon, Los Angeles County
    
    Jul 09: 2
    juveniles
    
    Leo Carrillo SP--seawatch, Los Angeles County
    
    Jun 11: 1
    2nd- or 3rd-year
    
    Offshore waters southwest of San Nicolas Island, Ventura County
    
    Jul 16: 1
    juvenile
    
    Hollywood Beach, Ventura County
    
    Jul 13: 1
    juvenile
    
    Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara County
    
    Jun 18: 1
    2nd-year
    
    Jul 10: 1
    juvenile
    
    Lucerne Dr. Vista Point -- Cayucos, San Luis Obispo County
    
    Jul 07: 1
    possible 2nd-year
    
    Jul 08: 2
    juveniles
    
    Jul 11: 3
    juveniles ,
    5
    juveniles ,
    5
    juveniles
    
    Jul 12: 3
    juveniles, 1 2nd-year
    
    Jul 15: 1
    juvenile
    
    Jul 16: 4
    juveniles
    
    Point Sierra Nevada Beach, San Luis Obispo County
    
    Jun 26: 1
    2nd-year
    
    Ocean View near Coral, Monterey County
    
    Jul 14: 3
    juveniles
    
    Monterey Bay pelagic (MTY Co.), Monterey County
    
    Jun 10: 1
    1st-cycle
    
    Pacific Grove--Hopkins Marine Station, Monterey County
    
    Jun 27: 2
    immature
    
    Jun 28: 1
    juvenile
    
    Jul 12: 2
    1st-year (probably juvenile)
    
    Jul 13: 1
    1st-year (probably juvenile)
    
    Moss Landing Harbor--Jetty Rd & north harbor, Monterey County
    
    Jul 14: 1
    juvenile
    
    Seacliff SB, Santa Cruz County
    
    Jun 25: 1
    1st-summer (juvenile)
    
    Half Moon Bay SB--Venice Beach and Pilarcitos Creek Mouth, San Mateo
    County
    
    Jun 27: 1
    2nd-year
    
    Jul 02: 1
    2nd-year
    
    Jul 12: 2
    juveniles, 1 2nd-year
    
    Pillar Point Harbor, San Mateo County
    
    Jul 13: 7
    juveniles
    
    Mori Pt., San Mateo County
    
    Jun 30: 1
    2nd-year
    
    San Francisco Ferry Building, San Francisco County
    
    Jul 08: 1
    immature
    
    Elk nearshore marine , Mendocino County
    
    Jul 13: 1
    juvenile
    
    Eureka Waterfront--Marina Way, Humboldt County
    
    Jul 12: 1
    juvenile
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2017-07-19 11:38, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    This morning (July 19) at 9:38am
    there were 5 juvenile Heermann's Gulls on the outer beach, amongst many
    more adults (not seemingly aloof from them as on July 17). Earlier (at
    7:24am) I had seen one on the inner beach. I won't continue to make these
    posts for normally-increasing numbers of juv HEEG, but wanted to convey
    that it seems pretty apparent they had a much better year of breeding
    than last year (and make up for saying "didn't show up again"
    and "didn't appear to associate with the juveniles" in the
    previous message).
    
    (Also note: all four videos finished processing on YouTube.)
    
    There continue to be small numbers of California Gulls (of all ages) and
    Ring-billed Gulls (only adults).
    
    More and more shorebirds have also been showing up. This morning there
    were 16 Willets (still in mostly breeding plumage) and 1 Black Turnstone
    on the inner beach. A Whimbrel was near the salt marsh.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2017-07-19 01:39, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    Yesterday (July 17) at 2:36pm I
    again noticed a juvenile HEEG on the outer beach. Three minutes later a
    second one showed up. By the time I'd gotten ready to go down and film
    them, a third had shown up. They let me film a decent amount of footage
    (starting at 3:13pm) and then suddenly all three flew away together at
    3:22pm and didn't show up again. (I had brought some peanuts that I was
    planning to feed them after filming some non-being-fed footage first, but
    didn't get the chance.) There were at least 39 adult HEEG on the outer
    beach (in various states of plumage, from full white heads to mostly
    speckled gray and everything in-between) and they didn't appear to
    associate with the juveniles at all.
    
    Here is some 4K and 6K video of them:
    
    https://youtu.be/7gfMIW_63uA - 4K (3504◊2336 @ 60fps
    
    YouTube
    downscales this to 3240◊2160)
    
    https://youtu.be/7g9dSJzr_I4 -
    4K (3504◊2336 @ 60fps) - best clip to watch if you only watch one of
    them
    
    https://youtu.be/AcCM_vLo39c - 6K (5184◊3456 @ 30fps
    
    YouTube
    downscales this to 4320◊2880)
    
    https://youtu.be/clIuQwBwBEQ - 4K (3504◊2336 @ 60fps) - includes
    preening by one, and another apparently acting alarmed at something
    
    (as of this posting, processing of the first one isn't done yet, and
    uploading of the last one hasn't finished)
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2017-07-11 22:43, David Ellsworth davidells@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    This morning at 7:22am, there
    were 38 Heermann's Gulls on the outer
    
    beach shore. 37 of them were adults in various states of breeding
    
    plumage to transitionary plumage, but one of them was quite clearly a
    
    first-year bird. This is the first one I've seen in about a year and
    
    a half. (I did see a second-year individual more recently in 2016,
    
    but no first-years.)
    
    Of course I wanted to photograph it, but it so happened that this was
    
    the morning I had my 100-400mm lens in a state of disassembly. I took
    
    some pictures with my phone through my spotting scope, but they
    
    hardly have enough detail to be worth sharing. By the time I had the
    
    lens reassembled, the HEEGs were gone.
    
    David Ellsworth
    
    San Pedro, CA
    
    At 2017-06-26 15:56, Kimball Garrett kgarrett@... [LACoBirds]
    wrote:
    
    >
    
    >Birders,
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >With Heermann's Gulls beginning to stream back into our region from
    
    >breeding colonies in (mostly) the Gulf of California, please pay
    
    >special attention to the age composition of birds you see, and
    
    >include this in your eBird reports. Groups of up to several dozen
    
    >are being seen along our coast, and so far nearly all individuals
    
    >reported/photographed have been adults (most still with completely
    
    >white heads), with just a handful of 3rd year birds. Has anybody
    
    >seen any 2nd year birds (i.e., hatched in 2016) or juveniles (i.e.,
    
    >hatched in 2017) Remember that there was essentially no breeding
    
    >in the major Gulf of California colonies last year or the year
    
    >before; I have heard third-hand that at least Elegant Terns were
    
    >breeding again this year in Gulf of California colonies, but I don't
    
    >know anything about this year's breeding by Heermann's Gulls.
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >If you do see juveniles (all dark brown with conspicuous pale
    
    >feather fringes on the wing coverts and pinkish-orange on the basal
    
    >half of the black bill) or 2nd year birds (solid dark gray-brown,
    
    >with much black on the tip of the orangish bill), please try to
    
    >document these with photographs.
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >Based on my own field experience, and on photos submitted to eBird,
    
    >there have only been a couple of 2016-hatched and very few
    
    >2015-hatched Heermann's Gulls in L. A. County this year, indicating
    
    >that near-complete breeding failures have occurred recently. In
    
    >hopes that the 2017 breeding season was better, please be on the
    
    >lookout for this year's young when you're birding the coast.
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >Kimball
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >
    
    >Kimball L. Garrett
    
    >
    
    >Ornithology Collections Manager
    
    >
    
    >Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    
    >
    
    >900 Exposition Blvd.
    
    >
    
    >Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    
    >
    
    >(213) 763-3368
    
    >
    
    >kgarrett@...
    
    >
    
    >
    
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
  12. -back to top-
  13. America's Birdiest County Results: 264 Species LINK
    DATE: May 11, 2017 @ 3:05pm, 9 month(s) ago
    Greetings Everyone,
    
    This is the final summary for America's Birdiest County in Los Angeles in 2017.
    
    First, I want to extend a huge thank you to Wanda Dameron, who graciously stepped forward to compile the count this year. She put in a lot of hard work but had fun and learned a lot.
    
    The final total in 2017 was 264 species. After the last update, we subtracted some species due to lack of documentation, added American Goldfinch that I had somehow missed, added Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron from El Dorado Park that was reported on April 30 (with a photo) in eBird, and added a northern watherthrush seen at Malibu Creek on April 29.
    
    How does our total compare with results from previous years
    
    America's Birdiest County totals for Los Angeles County since 2003:
    Year Total
    2017 264
    2016 270
    2015 275
    2014 272
    2013 265
    2012 262
    2011 277
    2010 271
    2009 264
    2008 255
    2007 271
    2006 263 Format changed from one day to three days; more organization
    2005 246
    2004 239
    2003 239
    
    Average from 2003-present: 262.2 +- 12.2 Updated to include 2017
    
    Our total in 2017 was two species above our long-term average of 262.
    
    Finding 264 species takes a lot of effort, and we got that many because a lot of very dedicated and knowledgeable people went into the field on April 28-30 and covered the vast majority of the most important locations for birds across the county. This resulted in excellent coverage at the Piute Ponds, Bonelli Park, the Ballona/Playa de Rey area, Hansen Dam, Quail Lake, for seawatches from Point Vicente and San Clemente Islan, and in the San Gabriel Mountains. There were also three Pasadena Audubon Birdathon teams in the field on Saturday and Sunday who tallied 200+ species.
    
    Nevertheless, we struggled to find some rarities that had apparently left within a few days of the count, and we struggled with some wintering birds that are often still in the area (examples include Hooded Merganser and Lewis' Woodpecker). Some birds we usually get relatively easily simply aren't here right now such as Heermann's Gull and Pine Siskin.
    
    We had to contend with a Santa Ana wind storm on Friday and Saturday. This is the fourth consecutive year that wind has been a factor, although in 2014, 2015, and 2016 it also rained.
    
    Previous America's Birdiest County winners:
    ...discontinued after 2011...
    2011 277 Los Angeles
    2010 271 Los Angeles
    2009 264 Los Angeles
    2008 255 Los Angeles
    2007 271 Los Angeles
    2006 263 Los Angeles
    2005 250 Monterey and San Diego (tie)
    2004 266 San Diego
    2003 248 Monterey
    
    America's Birdiest County was a one-day event during its first three years. Starting in 2006, the format changed to three days. 2006 is also the first year that we really got organized in Los Angeles County and that accounts for the distinct uptick in the number of species that year relative to the first three years.
    
    We added one new species this year:
    Yellow-Crowned Night Heron
    
    How does one new species in 2017 compare with results from previous years Here are the number of new species that we've added since 2010:
    2017 1
    2016 5
    2015 4
    2014 5
    2013 3
    2012 5
    2011 7
    2010 5
    Our recent history of adding a few species annually suggests there are still new species to find in future years. Given the near misses we have every year, it may be several more years before we run out of new ones.
    
    Here are the species that we FOUND in 2017:
    * Greater White-fronted Goose
    * Snow Goose
    * Ross's Goose
    * Brant
    * Cackling Goose
    * Canada Goose
    * Wood Duck
    * Gadwall
    * American Wigeon
    * Mallard
    * Blue-winged Teal
    * Cinnamon Teal
    * Northern Shoveler
    * Northern Pintail
    * Green-winged Teal
    * Redhead
    * Ring-necked Duck
    * Lesser Scaup
    * Surf Scoter
    * Bufflehead
    * Common Merganser
    * Red-breasted Merganser
    * Ruddy Duck
    * Chukar
    * Mountain Quail
    * California Quail
    * Gambel's Quail
    * Red-throated Loon
    * Pacific Loon
    * Common Loon
    * Pied-billed Grebe
    * Horned Grebe
    * Eared Grebe
    * Western Grebe
    * Clark's Grebe
    * Pink-footed Shearwater
    * Sooty Shearwater
    * Black-vented Shearwater
    * American White Pelican
    * Brown Pelican
    * Brandt's Cormorant
    * Double-crested Cormorant
    * Pelagic Cormorant
    * Least Bittern
    * Great Blue Heron
    * Great Egret
    * Snowy Egret
    * Green Heron
    * Black-crowned Night-Heron
    * Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
    * White-faced Ibis
    * Turkey Vulture
    * Osprey
    * White-tailed Kite
    * Northern Harrier
    * Sharp-shinned Hawk
    * Cooper's Hawk
    * Red-shouldered Hawk
    * Swainson's Hawk
    * Red-tailed Hawk
    * Golden Eagle
    * Bald Eagle
    * American Kestrel
    * Peregrine Falcon
    * Prairie Falcon
    * Virginia Rail
    * Sora
    * Common Gallinule
    * American Coot
    * Black-bellied Plover
    * Snowy Plover
    * Semipalmated Plover
    * Killdeer
    * Black Oystercatcher
    * Black-necked Stilt
    * American Avocet
    * Spotted Sandpiper
    * Solitary Sandpiper
    * Wandering Tattler
    * Greater Yellowlegs
    * Willet
    * Lesser Yellowlegs
    * Whimbrel
    * Marbled Godwit
    * Ruddy Turnstone
    * Black Turnstone
    * Surfbird
    * Sanderling
    * Western Sandpiper
    * Least Sandpiper
    * Dunlin
    * Short-billed Dowitcher
    * Long-billed Dowitcher
    * Wilson's Snipe
    * Wilson's Phalarope
    * Red-necked Phalarope
    * Franklin's Gull
    * Bonaparte's Gull
    * Ring-billed Gull
    * California Gull
    * Western Gull
    * Glaucous-winged Gull
    * Least Tern
    * Caspian Tern
    * Forster's Tern
    * Royal Tern
    * Elegant Tern
    * Black Skimmer
    * Parasitic Jaeger
    * Common Murre
    * Rock Pigeon
    * Band-tailed Pigeon
    * Eurasian Collared-Dove
    * Spotted Dove
    * Mourning Dove
    * Inca Dove
    * Common Ground-Dove
    * Red-crowned Parrot
    * Greater Roadrunner
    * Barn Owl
    * Flammulated Owl
    * Western Screech-Owl
    * Great Horned Owl
    * Northern Pygmy-Owl
    * Burrowing Owl
    * Spotted Owl
    * Long-eared Owl
    * Northern Saw-whet Owl
    * Lesser Nighthawk
    * Common Poorwill
    * Vaux's Swift
    * White-throated Swift
    * Black-chinned Hummingbird
    * Anna's Hummingbird
    * Costa's Hummingbird
    * Calliope Hummingbird
    * Rufous Hummingbird
    * Allen's Hummingbird
    * Belted Kingfisher
    * Acorn Woodpecker
    * Williamson's Sapsucker
    * Red-breasted Sapsucker
    * Nuttall's Woodpecker
    * Downy Woodpecker
    * Hairy Woodpecker
    * White-headed Woodpecker
    * Northern Flicker
    * Olive-sided Flycatcher
    * Western Wood-Pewee
    * Hammond's Flycatcher
    * Gray Flycatcher
    * Dusky Flycatcher
    * Pacific-slope Flycatcher
    * Black Phoebe
    * Say's Phoebe
    * Vermilion Flycatcher
    * Ash-throated Flycatcher
    * Cassin's Kingbird
    * Western Kingbird
    * Loggerhead Shrike
    * Bell's Vireo
    * Plumbeous Vireo
    * Cassin's Vireo
    * Hutton's Vireo
    * Warbling Vireo
    * Steller's Jay
    * California Scrub-Jay
    * Clark's Nutcracker
    * American Crow
    * Common Raven
    * Horned Lark
    * Purple Martin
    * Tree Swallow
    * Violet-green Swallow
    * Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    * Bank Swallow
    * Cliff Swallow
    * Barn Swallow
    * Mountain Chickadee
    * Oak Titmouse
    * Verdin
    * Bushtit
    * Red-breasted Nuthatch
    * White-breasted Nuthatch
    * Pygmy Nuthatch
    * Brown Creeper
    * Cactus Wren
    * Rock Wren
    * Canyon Wren
    * Bewick's Wren
    * House Wren
    * Marsh Wren
    * American Dipper
    * Golden-crowned Kinglet
    * Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    * Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    * California Gnatcatcher
    * Western Bluebird
    * Townsend's Solitaire
    * Swainson's Thrush
    * Hermit Thrush
    * American Robin
    * Wrentit
    * Northern Mockingbird
    * California Thrasher
    * LeConte's Thrasher
    * European Starling
    * American Pipit
    * Cedar Waxwing
    * Phainopepla
    * Northern Waterthrush
    * Orange-crowned Warbler
    * Nashville Warbler
    * Yellow Warbler
    * Yellow-rumped Warbler
    * Black-throated Gray Warbler
    * Townsend's Warbler
    * Hermit Warbler
    * MacGillivray's Warbler
    * Common Yellowthroat
    * Wilson's Warbler
    * Yellow-breasted Chat
    * Western Tanager
    * Green-tailed Towhee
    * Spotted Towhee
    * California Towhee
    * Rufous-crowned Sparrow
    * Chipping Sparrow
    * Brewer's Sparrow
    * Black-chinned Sparrow
    * Lark Sparrow
    * Black-throated Sparrow
    * Bell's Sparrow
    * Savannah Sparrow
    * Fox Sparrow
    * Song Sparrow
    * Lincoln's Sparrow
    * White-throated Sparrow
    * Harris' Sparrow
    * White-crowned Sparrow
    * Golden-crowned Sparrow
    * Dark-eyed Junco
    * Black-headed Grosbeak
    * Blue Grosbeak
    * Lazuli Bunting
    * Red-winged Blackbird
    * Tricolored Blackbird
    * Western Meadowlark
    * Yellow-headed Blackbird
    * Brewer's Blackbird
    * Great-tailed Grackle
    * Brown-headed Cowbird
    * Hooded Oriole
    * Bullock's Oriole
    * Scott's Oriole
    * Purple Finch
    * Cassin's Finch
    * House Finch
    * Red Crossbill
    * Lesser Goldfinch
    * Lawrence's Goldfinch
    * American Goldfinch
    * House Sparrow
    * Scaly-breasted Munia
    
    The table below lists every species we've recorded during the ABC weekend since 2004 and the number of years in which we've found each one. "11" indicates that we found a species in a given year and "00" indicates that we didn't. In an attempt to make the columns align, this year I added an extra "1" or "0" in each column.
    
    NN 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04 SPECIES
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Greater White-fronted Goose
    10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 00 00 00 11 Snow Goose
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ross's Goose
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Brant
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Cackling Goose
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Canada Goose
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Wood Duck
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Gadwall
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Wigeon
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Mallard
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Blue-winged Teal
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cinnamon Teal
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Northern Shoveler
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 Northern Pintail
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Green-winged Teal
    03 00 00 11 11 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 Canvasback
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Redhead
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ring-necked Duck
    01 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Greater Scaup
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Lesser Scaup
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Surf Scoter
    03 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 00 00 11 00 Black Scoter
    01 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 White-winged Scoter
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 Long-tailed Duck
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bufflehead
    03 00 00 11 11 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 Common Goldeneye
    07 00 11 00 11 00 11 00 11 00 00 11 11 00 11 Hooded Merganser
    11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 11 11 11 00 11 Common Merganser
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Red-breasted Merganser
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ruddy Duck
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Mountain Quail
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 California Quail
    10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 00 00 00 Gambel's Quail
    10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 00 00 00 Chukar
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-throated Loon
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Pacific Loon
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Common Loon
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 Yellow-billed Loon
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Pied-billed Grebe
    10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 00 00 Horned Grebe
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Eared Grebe
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Grebe
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Clark's Grebe
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Black-footed albatross
    03 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 11 11 Northern Fulmar
    11 11 11 11 11 00 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Pink-footed Shearwater
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Sooty Shearwater
    06 11 00 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 11 11 Black-vented Shearwater
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Brandt's Cormorant
    01 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Neotropic Cormorant
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Double-crested Cormorant
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Pelagic Cormorant
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 American White Pelican
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Brown Pelican
    04 00 11 00 00 00 11 11 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 American Bittern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Least Bittern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Great Blue Heron
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Great Egret
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Snowy Egret
    12 00 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cattle Egret
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Green Heron
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-crowned Night-Heron
    01 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 White-faced Ibis
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Turkey Vulture
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Osprey
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 White-tailed Kite
    12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 00 Golden Eagle
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Northern Harrier
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 Sharp-shinned Hawk
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cooper's Hawk
    02 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Bald Eagle
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-shouldered Hawk
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 Swainson's Hawk
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-tailed Hawk
    04 00 11 00 00 11 00 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 Ferruginous Hawk
    01 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Sandhill Crane
    01 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Ridgway's Rail
    12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 Virginia Rail
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Sora
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Common Gallinule
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Coot
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-bellied Plover
    02 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 Pacific Golden-Plover
    14 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Snowy Plover
    14 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Semipalmated Plover
    14 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Killdeer
    14 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black Oystercatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-necked Stilt
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Avocet
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Spotted Sandpiper
    12 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Solitary Sandpiper
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Wandering Tattler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Greater Yellowlegs
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Willet
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Lesser Yellowlegs
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Whimbrel
    13 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Long-billed Curlew
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Marbled Godwit
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ruddy Turnstone
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black Turnstone
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Surfbird
    02 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 Red Knot
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Sanderling
    02 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 Semipalmated Sandpiper
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Sandpiper
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Least Sandpiper
    03 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 Baird's Sandpiper
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Dunlin
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 Stilt Sandpiper
    01 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Ruff
    11 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 Short-billed Dowitcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Long-billed Dowitcher
    09 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 00 11 00 11 11 00 Wilson's Snipe
    11 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 Wilson's Phalarope
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-necked Phalarope
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 Red Phalarope
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 Sabine's Gull
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bonaparte's Gull
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 Laughing Gull
    07 11 11 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 11 11 Franklin's Gull
    13 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Heermann's Gull
    02 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 Mew Gull
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ring-billed Gull
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Gull
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 California Gull
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Herring Gull
    02 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 Thayer's Gull
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Glaucous-winged Gull
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 Glaucous Gull
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 Least Tern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Caspian Tern
    04 00 00 11 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 Black Tern
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 Common Tern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Forster's Tern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Royal Tern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Elegant Tern
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black Skimmer
    07 00 00 00 11 00 00 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 00 Pomarine Jaeger
    08 11 00 00 00 11 00 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 00 Parasitic Jaeger
    05 11 00 11 11 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Common Murre
    02 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 Scripps's Murrelet
    02 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 Cassin's Auklet
    03 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 Rhinoceros Auklet
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Rock Pigeon
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Band-tailed Pigeon
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Eurasian Collared-Dove
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Spotted Dove
    02 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 White-winged Dove
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Mourning Dove
    10 11 11 11 11 00 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 00 Inca Dove
    12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 Common Ground-Dove
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Greater Roadrunner
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Barn Owl
    09 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 00 11 00 11 00 Flammulated Owl
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Screech-Owl
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Great Horned Owl
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Northern Pygmy-Owl
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Burrowing Owl
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Spotted Owl
    05 11 11 00 00 00 11 11 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 Long-eared Owl
    12 11 11 00 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Northern Saw-whet Owl
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Lesser Nighthawk
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Common Poorwill
    02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 11 Black Swift ** SUSPECT **
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Vaux's Swift
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 White-throated Swift
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-chinned Hummingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Anna's Hummingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Costa's Hummingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Rufous Hummingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Allen's Hummingbird
    10 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 11 00 00 Calliope Hummingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Belted Kingfisher
    10 00 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 11 Lewis's Woodpecker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Acorn Woodpecker
    12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 Williamson's Sapsucker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-breasted Sapsucker
    01 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Red-naped Sapsucker
    11 00 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 Ladder-backed Woodpecker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Nuttall's Woodpecker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Downy Woodpecker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Hairy Woodpecker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 White-headed Woodpecker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Northern Flicker
    01 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Crested Caracara
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Kestrel
    11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 Merlin
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Peregrine Falcon
    12 11 00 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Prairie Falcon
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-crowned Parrot
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Olive-sided Flycatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Wood-Pewee
    02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 Willow Flycatcher ** SUSPECT **
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Hammond's Flycatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Gray Flycatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Dusky Flycatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Pacific-slope Flycatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black Phoebe
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Say's Phoebe
    05 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Vermilion Flycatcher
    03 00 00 00 11 00 11 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Dusky-capped Flycatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ash-throated Flycatcher
    04 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 11 00 11 00 Tropical Kingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cassin's Kingbird
    02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 11 00 00 Thick-billed Kingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Kingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Loggerhead Shrike
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bell's Vireo
    08 11 00 00 00 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 00 Plumbeous Vireo
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cassin's Vireo
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Hutton's Vireo
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Warbling Vireo
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Steller's Jay
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Scrub-Jay
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 Clark's Nutcracker
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Crow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Common Raven
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Horned Lark
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    06 11 00 00 11 00 11 00 11 11 00 11 00 00 00 Purple Martin
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Tree Swallow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Violet-green Swallow
    12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 11 Bank Swallow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Barn Swallow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cliff Swallow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Mountain Chickadee
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Oak Titmouse
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Verdin
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bushtit
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-breasted Nuthatch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 White-breasted Nuthatch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Pygmy Nuthatch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Brown Creeper
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Rock Wren
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Canyon Wren
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 House Wren
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Marsh Wren
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bewick's Wren
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cactus Wren
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 California Gnatcatcher
    10 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 00 00 American Dipper
    05 11 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 11 11 00 11 Golden-crowned Kinglet
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Wrentit
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Bluebird
    01 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Mountain Bluebird
    11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 00 00 Townsend's Solitaire
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Swainson's Thrush
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Hermit Thrush
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Robin
    01 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Varied Thrush
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Northern Mockingbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 California Thrasher
    10 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 00 Le Conte's Thrasher
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 European Starling
    01 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Red-throated Pipit
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Pipit
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cedar Waxwing
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Phainopepla
    02 11 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Northern Waterthrush
    05 00 11 11 11 00 00 00 11 00 00 11 00 00 00 Black-and-white Warbler
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 Tennessee Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Orange-crowned Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Nashville Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 MacGillivray's Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Common Yellowthroat
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 Hooded Warbler
    02 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 American Redstart
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Northern Parula
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Yellow Warbler
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Chestnut-sided Warbler
    07 00 00 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 00 00 11 00 11 Palm Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Yellow-rumped Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-throated Gray Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Townsend's Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Hermit Warbler
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Wilson's Warbler
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 Painted Redstart
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Yellow-breasted Chat
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Green-tailed Towhee
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Spotted Towhee
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Rufous-crowned Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 California Towhee
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Chipping Sparrow
    02 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 Clay-colored Sparrow
    11 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 00 11 Brewer's Sparrow
    01 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Field Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-chinned Sparrow
    01 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Vesper Sparrow
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 Lark Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-throated Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bell's Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Savannah Sparrow
    04 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 00 11 00 00 Grasshopper Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Fox Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Song Sparrow
    13 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Lincoln's Sparrow
    01 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Swamp Sparrow
    10 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 11 11 00 11 11 00 00 White-throated Sparrow
    03 11 00 11 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Harris' Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 White-crowned Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Golden-crowned Sparrow
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Dark-eyed Junco
    06 00 00 00 00 11 11 00 11 00 11 11 00 00 11 Summer Tanager
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Tanager
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Black-headed Grosbeak
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Blue Grosbeak
    01 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Indigo Bunting
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Lazuli Bunting
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Red-winged Blackbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Tricolored Blackbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Western Meadowlark
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Yellow-headed Blackbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Brewer's Blackbird
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Great-tailed Grackle
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Brown-headed Cowbird
    03 00 00 11 11 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Orchard Oriole
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Hooded Oriole
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Bullock's Oriole
    01 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Baltimore Oriole
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Scott's Oriole
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Purple Finch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Cassin's Finch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 House Finch
    11 11 11 11 11 11 00 11 00 11 11 11 11 11 00 Red Crossbill
    12 00 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 00 Pine Siskin
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Lesser Goldfinch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 Lawrence's Goldfinch
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 American Goldfinch
    01 00 00 00 00 00 00 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 Evening Grosbeak
    14 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 House Sparrow
    04 11 11 11 11 ........not countable........ Scaly-breasted Munia
    
    Total: 333 species
    
    If you look closely you'll see that we flagged willow flycatcher and black swift as "suspect." We no longer believe earlier records of Willow Flycatcher and Black Swift because those species don't usually occur before the end of the first week of May and because we neglected to request documentation when they were reported in 2004-2007.
    
    Of the 333 species we've found to date, we have found the same 208 during every year, accounting for about 80% of our annual total. We have also found 34 species only once, indicating that about 10% are "one-hit wonders." Examples from previous years include yellow-billed loon, field sparrow, ruff, and red-throated pipit. There are also numerous species that we find about 1/2 of the time, probably a consequence of the fact that we schedule the event in late April when wintering birds are leaving and when many spring migrants are just arriving.
    
    This year we did pretty well with ocean birds. This was one of the only the fifth time in 15 years that we've gotten three shearwater species. We also got one alcid, which usually give us trouble. Seawatches from San Clemente Island and Point Vicente were fruitful despite the strong winds on Friday and Saturday around the county.
    
    We also did better than usual in the Antelope Valley, foothills, and in the San Gabriel Mountains.
    
    In more detail, if you scan through the table above, you'll see that we swept up a number of species this year that we find less than 1/2 of the time. Here are species we found that were particularly notable:
    06 Black-Vented Shearwater
    01 Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron NEW
    02 Bald Eagle
    07 Franklin's Gull
    05 Common Murre
    04 Long-Eared Owl
    05 Vermilion Flycatcher
    06 Purple Martin
    05 Golden-Crowned Kinglet
    02 Northern Waterthrush
    03 Harris' sparrow
    
    Once again, the number in the first two columns gives the number of years when we have found this species since 2004. These are species reported during seven or fewer counts except for Scaly-Breasted Munia, which was recently added to the offical count list. Bald eagle is a species we didn't count previously due to concerns that they required human assistance for nesting. The presence of a nest at the San Gabriel Dam clearly establishes that they're nesting without our help and that our previous approach was too conservative.
    
    Among these species, the most unusual was the Yellow-Crowned Night-Heron, which was new for ABC weekend. The Harris' sparrow is obviously rare but its presence was known well in advance. The northern waterthrush was a very pleasant surprise: this was only the second time we've found one during the count.
    
    On the other hand, although this is only the fifth time we've found vermilion flycatcher, it's also the fourth consecutive year that we've found it. When compiling the list of possible rarities prior to the weekend, it became apparent that vermilion flycatchers are now being reported widely across Los Angeles County, so their numbers are clearly increasing. This appears to represent an actual expansion of their range.
    
    Here are the worst misses from 2017:
    12 Cattle Egret
    12 Long-Billed Curlew
    13 Heermann's Gull
    12 Herring Gull
    10 Lewis' Woodpecker
    11 Ladder-Backed Woodpecker
    11 Merlin
    12 Pine Siskin
    
    This is the first time that we've missed Heermann's Gull. That species has been scarce in our area recently, perhaps because most of the adults have left for the breeding grounds in Mexico, and possibly also because of three consecutive years of breeding failure. One (but only one) Heermann's gull was reported on a pelagic trip on April 29, but the ABC rules prevent us from counting birds seen from boats.
    
    In addition, something is going on with pine siskins. This was the most significant species from the mountains that we missed. There are very few reports in eBird in the local mountains of Los Angeles Cou
    
    (Message over 64 KB, truncated)
  14. -back to top-
  15. ABC FOUND species LINK
    DATE: May 1, 2017 @ 9:48pm, 10 month(s) ago
    Greetings Everyone,
    
    Here are all the species we FOUND during the past weekend:
    
    * Greater White-fronted Goose
    * Snow Goose
    * Ross's Goose
    * Brant
    * Cackling Goose
    * Canada Goose
    * Wood Duck
    * Gadwall
    * American Wigeon
    * Mallard
    * Blue-winged Teal
    * Cinnamon Teal
    * Northern Shoveler
    * Northern Pintail
    * Green-winged Teal
    * Redhead
    * Ring-necked Duck
    * Lesser Scaup
    * Surf Scoter
    * Bufflehead
    * Common Merganser
    * Red-breasted Merganser
    * Ruddy Duck
    * Chukar
    * Mountain Quail
    * California Quail
    * Gambel's Quail
    * Red-throated Loon
    * Pacific Loon
    * Common Loon
    * Pied-billed Grebe
    * Horned Grebe
    * Eared Grebe
    * Western Grebe
    * Clark's Grebe
    * Pink-footed Shearwater
    * Sooty Shearwater
    * Black-vented Shearwater
    * American White Pelican
    * Brown Pelican
    * Brandt's Cormorant
    * Double-crested Cormorant
    * Pelagic Cormorant
    * Least Bittern
    * Great Blue Heron
    * Great Egret
    * Snowy Egret
    * Green Heron
    * Black-crowned Night-Heron
    * White-faced Ibis
    * Turkey Vulture
    * Osprey
    * White-tailed Kite
    * Northern Harrier
    * Sharp-shinned Hawk
    * Cooper's Hawk
    * Red-shouldered Hawk
    * Swainson's Hawk
    * Red-tailed Hawk
    * Golden Eagle
    * Bald Eagle
    * American Kestrel
    * Peregrine Falcon
    * Prairie Falcon
    * Virginia Rail
    * Sora
    * Common Gallinule
    * American Coot
    * Black-bellied Plover
    * Snowy Plover
    * Semipalmated Plover
    * Killdeer
    * Black Oystercatcher
    * Black-necked Stilt
    * American Avocet
    * Spotted Sandpiper
    * Solitary Sandpiper
    * Wandering Tattler
    * Greater Yellowlegs
    * Willet
    * Lesser Yellowlegs
    * Whimbrel
    * Marbled Godwit
    * Ruddy Turnstone
    * Black Turnstone
    * Surfbird
    * Sanderling
    * Semipalmated Sandpiper
    * Western Sandpiper
    * Least Sandpiper
    * Dunlin
    * Short-billed Dowitcher
    * Long-billed Dowitcher
    * Wilson's Snipe
    * Wilson's Phalarope
    * Red-necked Phalarope
    * Franklin's Gull
    * Bonaparte's Gull
    * Ring-billed Gull
    * California Gull
    * Western Gull
    * Glaucous-winged Gull
    * Least Tern
    * Caspian Tern
    * Forster's Tern
    * Royal Tern
    * Elegant Tern
    * Black Skimmer
    * Parasitic Jaeger
    * Common Murre
    * Rock Pigeon
    * Band-tailed Pigeon
    * Eurasian Collared-Dove
    * Spotted Dove
    * Mourning Dove
    * Inca Dove
    * Common Ground-Dove
    * Red-crowned Parrot
    * Greater Roadrunner
    * Barn Owl
    * Flammulated Owl
    * Western Screech-Owl
    * Great Horned Owl
    * Northern Pygmy-Owl
    * Burrowing Owl
    * Spotted Owl
    * Long-eared Owl
    * Northern Saw-whet Owl
    * Lesser Nighthawk
    * Common Poorwill
    * Vaux's Swift
    * White-throated Swift
    * Black-chinned Hummingbird
    * Anna's Hummingbird
    * Costa's Hummingbird
    * Calliope Hummingbird
    * Rufous Hummingbird
    * Allen's Hummingbird
    * Belted Kingfisher
    * Acorn Woodpecker
    * Williamson's Sapsucker
    * Red-breasted Sapsucker
    * Nuttall's Woodpecker
    * Downy Woodpecker
    * Hairy Woodpecker
    * White-headed Woodpecker
    * Northern Flicker
    * Olive-sided Flycatcher
    * Western Wood-Pewee
    * Hammond's Flycatcher
    * Gray Flycatcher
    * Dusky Flycatcher
    * Pacific-slope Flycatcher
    * Black Phoebe
    * Say's Phoebe
    * Vermilion Flycatcher
    * Ash-throated Flycatcher
    * Cassin's Kingbird
    * Western Kingbird
    * Loggerhead Shrike
    * Bell's Vireo
    * Plumbeous Vireo
    * Cassin's Vireo
    * Hutton's Vireo
    * Warbling Vireo
    * Steller's Jay
    * California Scrub-Jay
    * Clark's Nutcracker
    * American Crow
    * Common Raven
    * Horned Lark
    * Purple Martin
    * Tree Swallow
    * Violet-green Swallow
    * Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    * Bank Swallow
    * Cliff Swallow
    * Barn Swallow
    * Mountain Chickadee
    * Oak Titmouse
    * Verdin
    * Bushtit
    * Red-breasted Nuthatch
    * White-breasted Nuthatch
    * Pygmy Nuthatch
    * Brown Creeper
    * Cactus Wren
    * Rock Wren
    * Canyon Wren
    * Bewick's Wren
    * House Wren
    * Marsh Wren
    * American Dipper
    * Golden-crowned Kinglet
    * Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    * Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    * California Gnatcatcher
    * Western Bluebird
    * Townsend's Solitaire
    * Swainson's Thrush
    * Hermit Thrush
    * American Robin
    * Wrentit
    * Northern Mockingbird
    * California Thrasher
    * LeConte's Thrasher
    * European Starling
    * American Pipit
    * Cedar Waxwing
    * Phainopepla
    * Orange-crowned Warbler
    * Nashville Warbler
    * Yellow Warbler
    * Yellow-rumped Warbler
    * Black-throated Gray Warbler
    * Townsend's Warbler
    * Hermit Warbler
    * MacGillivray's Warbler
    * Common Yellowthroat
    * Wilson's Warbler
    * Yellow-breasted Chat
    * Western Tanager
    * Green-tailed Towhee
    * Spotted Towhee
    * California Towhee
    * Rufous-crowned Sparrow
    * Chipping Sparrow
    * Brewer's Sparrow
    * Black-chinned Sparrow
    * Lark Sparrow
    * Black-throated Sparrow
    * Bell's Sparrow
    * Savannah Sparrow
    * Fox Sparrow
    * Song Sparrow
    * Lincoln's Sparrow
    * White-throated Sparrow
    * Harris' Sparrow
    * White-crowned Sparrow
    * Golden-crowned Sparrow
    * Dark-eyed Junco
    * Black-headed Grosbeak
    * Blue Grosbeak
    * Lazuli Bunting
    * Red-winged Blackbird
    * Tricolored Blackbird
    * Western Meadowlark
    * Yellow-headed Blackbird
    * Brewer's Blackbird
    * Great-tailed Grackle
    * Brown-headed Cowbird
    * Hooded Oriole
    * Bullock's Oriole
    * Scott's Oriole
    * Purple Finch
    * Cassin's Finch
    * House Finch
    * Red Crossbill
    * Lesser Goldfinch
    * Lawrence's Goldfinch
    * House Sparrow
    * Scaly-breasted Munia
    
    These are in something close to taxonomic order, although recent updates have moved some species around. I'll try to incorporate those changes by next year.
    
    --Lance
    
    Lance Benner
    Altadena, CA
  16. -back to top-
  17. Re: [LACoBirds] America's Birdiest County April 28-30: Detailed Information LINK
    DATE: Apr 24, 2017 @ 12:19pm, 10 month(s) ago
    Lanca & Wanda: Sorry but I won't be able to participate this year.I will be birding in Spain as of April 28th.
    
    Irwin Woldman
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. America's Birdiest County April 28-30: Detailed Information LINK
    DATE: Apr 24, 2017 @ 11:50am, 10 month(s) ago
    Hi Everyone,
    
    Here's additional information about the "America's Birdiest County" event that will happen in Los Angeles County on April 28-30.
    
    The count starts at midnight on Thursday night/Friday morning and ends at midnight on Sunday night/Monday morning.
    
    The objective is to find as many species in Los Angeles County over this three day interval as possible. We've been doing this since 2003 and regularly find more than 260 species.
    
    Birds can be identified by sight or sound, and as usual, rare species require documentation. All birds must be counted from land, so we can't accept anything seen on a whale watch, or from a boat on a lake, but we'd be glad to count any birds seen from Santa Catalina and San Clemente Islands or from seawatches at places such as Point Vicente and Point Dume.
    
    This year I will be out of town on Saturday and Sunday, so I will not act as the compiler. Intead, Wanda Dameron has kindly stepped forward and volunteered to compile this year's count. Please send emails with reports to her and/or post them on the LA County listserve.
    
    Wanda's email address is:
    
    wandadameron2@...
    
    HISTORY
    
    America's Birdiest County started in 2003 in San Diego as a friendly competition among counties across the country to see how many species people could find in a single 24-hour period.
    
    After the first three years, the organizers changed the protocol to make it a three-day event. There were also various categories across the country to try to level the playing field so that counties in very different areas wouldn't be competing against those in other areas that have vastly more birds. Thus, counties in, say, Maine weren't competing against counties in California. Los Angeles was in the "Coastal West" category and our chief competition, at least initially, was with San Diego and Monterey. After the format changed to a three-day event, Monterey stopped competing in order to continue their traditional one-day county-wide birdathon. After 2011, the organizers discontinued the nationwide event, but selected counties continued due to strong local interest. Los Angeles and Kern Counties, which usually did very well, have both continued, and recently Orange and Ventura Counties have started similar events around the same time. This year San Bernardino County started a count and had reported more than 230 species as of Sunday night.
    
    Here are the number of species found in Los Angeles County since 2003:
    Year Total
    2016 270
    2015 275
    2014 272
    2013 265
    2012 262
    2011 277
    2010 271
    2009 264
    2008 255
    2007 272
    2006 265
    2005 246
    2004 240
    2003 239
    
    Our total jumped in 2006 due to better organization and increased interest.
    
    This event has turned into an intensive sweep of the whole county each spring, and has provided a useful snapshot of the species that are present in late April. Many people who participate also record their observations in eBird, and as a result, tens of thousands of birds sightings are permanently archived, so in addition to having fun, we're also making a scientifically useful contribution.
    
    ######################################
    
    LOGISTICS
    
    Please email reports to Wanda at wandadameron2@... and/or to the LA County listserve.
    
    We welcome forwarding eBird checklists--they make checking for new species really easy.
    The easiest way to do this is to email the eBird list to yourself and then forward it to Wanda.
    
    Wanda will provide updates two to four times each day to track our progress and to help guide searches for species we're missing. The first update will probably happen by early afternoon on Friday. We will also provide updates each night so that we everyone can see what we still need first thing in the morning.
    
    Please note that we can't count birds seen from boats, but birds seen from Santa Catalina and San Clemente Island count. Also, the Gambel's quail and chukars on San Clemente Island are self-sustaining so we can count them. Also, to continue the protocol we adopted last year, we are now glad to count bald eagles seen from Santa Catalina and San Clemente Islands.
    
    ######################################
    
    NON-NATIVE SPECIES:
    
    Kimball Garrett asks us to please report established non-native species even if they're not the list that's accepted by the AOU or the CBRC.
    
    This means that we want to hear about introduced species such as parakeets and parrots, pin-tailed whydahs, orange bishops, red-whiskered bulbuls, Mandarin ducks, and so forth. Monitoring those populations is becoming increasingly important so please report them, and, of course, enter your sightings into eBird.
    
    We'll keep them in a supplemental list separate from the "regular" species.
    
    ######################################
    
    RARE OR UNCOMMON SPECIES
    
    We've been keeping track of some notable species that have been in the area
    recently. Some are truly rare but others are regular winter visitors that become
    scarce and challenging to find in late April. Below is a partial list; we're sure
    there are some things that we missed. Please note that some of these species have
    not been found during previous ABC weekends, and for some birds it's been a few
    weeks since we've seen reports in eBird, on the listserve, or in various rare bird alerts.
    
    3/22 *Tundra Swan Pierce College, Woodland Hills
    2/26 *Eurasian Wigeon Oxford Basin, Marina del Rey
    3/20 *Eurasian Wigeon Madrona Marsh
    3/06 Canvasback Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds
    3/27 Greater Scaup Quail Lake
    3/12 Greater Scaup Aqueduct/255th St. West
    4/05 Black Scoter Dockweiler Beach
    4/05 White-winged Scoter Dockweiler Beach
    3/06 Common Goldeneye Rio Hondo
    3/07 Common Goldeneye Cabrillo beach
    3/11 Common Goldeneye Peck R. Water Conservation Area
    3/11 Common Goldeneye Una Lake, just east of Lake Palmdale
    3/12 Common Goldeneye Quail Lake
    3/21 Common Goldeneye Piute Ponds
    3/25 Hooded Merganser Bette Davis Park & Glendale Narrows
    3/23 Hooded Merganser Apollo Park
    3/08 Hooded Merganser Piute Ponds
    3/21 Hooded Merganser Sepulveda Basin
    3/21 Hooded Merganser Ballona Fresh Water Marsh
    3/14 Hooded Merganser Descanso Gardens
    3/20 Hooded Merganser Malibu Creek State Park
    3/30 Hooded Merganser Hahamongna Watershed Park
    3/25 Hooded Merganser Hansen Dam
    3/25 Hooded Merganser Big Tujunga Wash north of 210
    4/10 *Brown Booby Cabrillo Beach Park/San Pedro Fishing Pier
    4/20 Neotropic Cormorant Bonelli Park
    4/15 American Bittern Ballona Freshwater Marsh
    3/08 Cattle Egret Piute Ponds
    3/26 Cattle Egret Santa Fe Dam
    4/13 Cattle Egret Malibu Lagoon
    4/20 *Yellow-crowned NightHeron El Dorado Park, main pond, along the edge
    3/14 *California Condor Pyramid Lake, north end near Emigrant Landing
    3/07 Ferruginous Hawk Petersen Ranch, just east of Lake Elizabeth Rd/Johnson Rd. junction
    3/12 Ferruginous Hawk Antelope Valley Poppy Preserve
    3/20 Bald Eagle San Gabriel Dam, Highway 39
    3/25 Bald Eagle Bonelli Park
    3/25 Virginia Rail Piute Ponds
    3/25 Virginia Rail Ballona Freshwater Marsh
    3/25 Long-billed Curlew Piute Ponds
    4/19 Long-billed Curlew Lancaster Sewer Ponds
    4/19 Long-billed Curlew Ballona Creek Jetties
    4/19 Long-billed Curlew Del Rey Lagoon
    3/22 Red Knot Playa del Rey end of jetties
    3/21 Red Knot Ballona Creek, Pacific Ave. bridge
    4/13 Wilson's Snipe Madrona Marsh
    3/11 Wilson's Snipe Bonelli Park
    3/14 Wilson's Snipe Ballona Freshwater Marsh
    3/20 Wilson's Snipe Cal State Dominguez Hills
    4/19 Wilson's Snipe Piute Ponds
    4/19 Solitary Sandpiper Madrona Marsh
    4/19 Solitary Sandpiper Piute Ponds
    4/19 Solitary Sandpiper Sepulveda Basin
    4/19 Common Murre Zuma Beach. Bird was oiled and rescued.
    2/26 Mew Gull Junipero Beach, Long Beach
    3/02 Mew Gull Ballona Creek, Lincoln to Highway 90
    3/25 Mew Gull Ballona Creek Mouth/Jetties & breakwater
    3/25 Mew Gull Cabrillo Beach Park
    3/04 Mew Gull Dockweiler State Beach
    3/22 Mew Gull LA River, Willow Street
    2/20 *Yellow-footed Gull Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds
    3/12 *Yellow-footed Gull LA River between Atlantic and Alondra
    3/18 *Lesser Black-backed Gull Rio Hondo Spreading Grounds
    3/04 *Iceland Gull Rio Hondo spreading grounds
    4/16 Common Tern Bonelli Park
    4/15 Inca Dove Lake Los Angeles
    4/10 Inca Dove Colonel Leon Washington Park
    4/20 Common Ground-Dove San Gabriel River Trail, Trabuco St. (Bellflower)
    4/17 Common Ground-dove San Gabriel River Trail, north of Cerritos golf course
    4/21 White-winged Dove Crystalaire, Antelope Valley
    3/18 Long-eared Owl Apollo Park, NW corner in tamarisks
    3/04 *Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Bixby Marshland in Carson
    2/21 Red-naped Sapsucker El Dorado Regional Park, Area 3
    2/27 Red-naped Sapsucker Hansen Dam
    2/27 Red-naped Sapsucker Lower Arroyo Seco, South Pasadena
    2/28 Red-naped Sapsucker Ponderosa Lane, Palos Verdes
    4/19 Prairie Falcon Piute Ponds
    4/15 *Least Flycatcher Whitter Narrows
    3/14 *Eastern Phoebe Madrona Marsh
    3/15 *Eastern Phoebe Bonelli Park north, picnic area 4
    2/25 Vermilion Flycatcher West Antelope Valley: 138/286th west
    2/26 Vermilion Flycatcher Earvin Magic Johnson Recreation Area
    4/02 Vermilion Flycatcher Oakdale Memorial Park (cemetery), Glendora
    3/10 Vermilion Flycatcher LA National Cemetery
    3/04 Vermilion Flycatcher Columbia Park in Torrance
    3/18 Vermilion Flycatcher El Dorado Regional Park, area 2
    3/19 Vermilion Flycatcher La Mirada Park
    4/04 Vermilion Flycatcher Santa Fe Dam
    4/15 Vermilion Flycatcher Madrona Marsh
    4/18 Vermilion Flycatcher Crystalaire Country Club, Antelope Valley
    4/15 Vermilion Flycatcher Apollo Park
    3/22 Dusky-capped Flycatcher La Mirada Creek Park, La Mirada
    3/15 Dusky-capped Flycatcher John Anson Ford Park, Bell Gardens
    3/06 Thick-billed Kingbird Horsethief Canyon Park in San Dimas
    2/27 Tropical Kingbird Earvin Magic Johnson Recreation Area
    3/20 Tropical Kingbird El Dorado Park, area 3
    3/30 Tropical Kingbird Lake Balboa
    4/17 Tropical Kingbird Peck Pits
    4/23 *Yellow throated Vireo Rocky Oaks Park, Mulholland Dr, West of Kanan-Dume Road
    2/26 Plumbeous Vireo Earvin Magic Johnson Recreation Area
    3/25 Plumbeous Vireo Hansen Dam
    3/26 Plumbeous vireo Santa Fe Dam
    3/26 Plumbeous Vireo Valley Plaza Park, North Hollywood
    4/08 Plumbeous Vireo Wardlow Park in Long Beach
    4/10 Plumbeous Vireo Arcadia County Park
    4/21 Plumbeous Vireo Santa Clara River, Santa Clarita (34.4366,-118.6099)
    3/23 *Black-tailed gnatcatcher Edwards AFB Mequite Forest (off limits to the public)
    3/04 American Dipper mile 4.75, West Fork, San Gabriel River
    3/12 American Dipper East Fork, San Gabriel River, near Bridge to Nowhere
    3/19 American Dipper Barrett-Stoddard Road, near Baldy Village
    3/03 Golden-crowned Kinglet 9800 East G10, Antelope Valley (N of 100th East/East Ave H)
    3/23 Golden-crowned Kinglet Peck Park, San Pedro
    2/25 Mountain Bluebird Gorman Post Road pond
    2/26 Mountain Bluebird San Clemente Island
    3/11 Mountain Bluebird Nebeker Ranch
    3/07 Mountain Bluebird Petersen Ranch, E of Lake Elizabeth
    4/22 *Gray Catbird West San Gabriel River Parkway Nature Trail (Monte Verde Park)
    4/19 Le Conte's Thrasher Piute Ponds
    4/22 Northern Parula Peck Pits, far north end
    3/07 Palm Warbler Entradero park (Dave Moody)
    4/09 Palm Warbler Hahamongna Watershed Park
    4/22 Palm Warbler Banning Park in Wilmington
    4/15 Palm Warbler Madrona Marsh
    4/16 Palm Warbler Sand Dune Park
    4/16 Palm Warbler South Gate Park behind the large Sports Center Building, working trees
    3/12 *Yellow-throated Warbler Earvin Magic Johnson Recreation Area
    2/20 Black-and-white Warbler La Mirada Park
    2/25 Black-and-white Warbler LA County Arboretum
    3/02 Black-and-white Warbler El Segundo Library Park
    4/19 Black-and-white Warbler Madrona Marsh
    3/20 Black-and-white Warbler Legg Lake, near restroom 7
    4/08 Black and white Warbler LA River/Oros Street, 200 m upstream from lower end of riparian
    4/20 Black and white Warbler Ralph Dills Park
    4/02 Pine Warbler Santa Fe Dam
    2/21 Painted Redstart Palos Verdes, just north of South Coast Botanic Garden
    3/04 Green-tailed Towhee West San Gabriel River Parkway Nature Trail, Lakewood
    2/28 Swamp Sparrow Playa Vista riparian corridor
    3/09 Clay-colored Sparrow Exposition Park
    4/17 Clay-colored Sparrow Santa Fe Dam
    4/08 Clay-colored Sparrow West San Gabriel River Parkway Nature Trail, South of Del Amo
    4/09 Harris' Sparrow Thompson Creek Trail/Pomello, Claremont
    3/12 White throated Sparrow Cobb Estate, Altadena
    2/27 White-throated Sparrow LA County Arboretum
    2/24 White-throated Sparrow Holmby Hills
    3/01 White-throated Sparrow Wilmington Drain above PCH
    2/25 White-throated Sparrow Alta Vicente Preserve
    4/09 White-throated Sparrow South Coast Botanic Garden
    4/17 White-throated Sparrow Sand Dune Park
    4/13 White-throated Sparrow Los Liones Park, near the Getty Villa
    3/28 White-throated Sparrow Beverly Hills 2 SG neighborhood
    3/24 White-throated Sparrow Neff Park, La Mirada
    3/30 White-throated Sparrow David Bell's house in La Canada-Flintridge
    4/17 White-throated Sparrow 14 Crest Road, LA (private residence)
    4/19 White-throated Sparrow Ed Thomas' yard
    3/03 Vesper Sparrow Santa Fe Dam
    4/13 Vesper Sparrow Poppy Preserve
    3/11 Vesper Sparrow Nebeker Ranch
    2/26 Summer Tanager Mentor Ave/Arden Road, Pasadena
    4/08 Summer Tanager Wardlow Park, SE quadrant and near parking lot (Long Beach)
    3/27 Baltimore Oriole La Mirada Park
    4/05 Baltimore Oriole Elysian Park, Chavez Ravine. NW of Grace E. Simons Lodge in silk oaks.
    2/27 Orchard Oriole LA Arboretum
    4/07 Orchard Oriole 4823 Ben Ave., Los Angeles.
    
    * = new to the count if we find it
    
    As always, anything flagged as "rare" in eBird is going to require documentation,
    so please take photos, jot down notes, obtain recordings and videos, or make sketches.
    
    #########################################
    
    SPECIES PREVIOUSLY RECORDED
    
    Below is the master list of every species we've found during previous ABC weekends.
    
    There are some species that we get regularly that are actually quite local and require special effort to find and/or that are just leaving or arriving at this time of year . Among them, in no particular order, are prairie falcon, American dipper, common ground-dove, Inca dove, spotted owl, northern saw-whet owl, northern pygmy owl, flammulated owl, burrowing owl, golden-crowned kinglet, Le Conte's thrasher, Williamson's sapsucker, red crossbill, Swainson's hawk, common merganser, hooded merganser, summer tanager, and golden eagle.
    
    We often struggle to find pelagic species; alcids are particularly difficult.
    
    The table below lists every species we've recorded during the ABC weekend since 2004 and the number of years in which we've found it.
    
    N = number of years we've found a species from 2004-present.
    
    N SPECIES
    12 Greater White-fronted Goose
    09 Snow Goose
    13 Ross's Goose
    12 Brant
    13 Cackling Goose
    13 Canada Goose
    13 Wood Duck
    13 Gadwall
    13 American Wigeon
    13 Mallard
    13 Blue-winged Teal
    13 Cinnamon Teal
    13 Northern Shoveler
    12 Northern Pintail
    13 Green-winged Teal
    03 Canvasback
    13 Redhead
    13 Ring-necked Duck
    01 Greater Scaup
    13 Lesser Scaup
    01 White-winged Scoter
    13 Surf Scoter
    03 Black Scoter
    01 Long-tailed Duck
    12 Bufflehead
    03 Common Goldeneye
    07 Hooded Merganser
    10 Common Merganser
    12 Red-breasted Merganser
    13 Ruddy Duck
    13 Mountain Quail
    13 California Quail
    09 Gambel's Quail
    09 Chukar
    13 Red-throated Loon
    13 Pacific Loon
    13 Common Loon
    01 Yellow-billed Loon
    13 Pied-billed Grebe
    09 Horned Grebe
    13 Eared Grebe
    13 Western Grebe
    13 Clark's Grebe
    01 Black-footed albatross
    03 Northern Fulmar
    10 Pink-footed Shearwater
    13 Sooty Shearwater
    05 Black-vented Shearwater
    13 Brandt's Cormorant
    01 Neotropic Cormorant
    13 Double-crested Cormorant
    13 Pelagic Cormorant
    12 American White Pelican
    13 Brown Pelican
    04 American Bittern
    13 Least Bittern
    13 Great Blue Heron
    13 Great Egret
    13 Snowy Egret
    12 Cattle Egret
    13 Green Heron
    13 Black-crowned Night-Heron
    13 White-faced Ibis
    13 Turkey Vulture
    13 Osprey
    13 White-tailed Kite
    11 Golden Eagle
    01 Bald Eagle
    12 Northern Harrier
    12 Sharp-shinned Hawk
    13 Cooper's Hawk
    13 Red-shouldered Hawk
    12 Swainson's Hawk
    13 Red-tailed Hawk
    04 Ferruginous Hawk
    01 Sandhill Crane
    12 Virginia Rail
    13 Sora
    01 Ridgeway's Rail
    13 Common Gallinule
    13 American Coot
    13 Black-bellied Plover
    02 Pacific Golden-Plover
    13 Snowy Plover
    13 Semipalmated Plover
    13 Killdeer
    13 Black Oystercatcher
    13 Black-necked Stilt
    13 American Avocet
    13 Spotted Sandpiper
    12 Solitary Sandpiper
    13 Wandering Tattler
    13 Greater Yellowlegs
    13 Willet
    12 Lesser Yellowlegs
    13 Whimbrel
    12 Long-billed Curlew
    13 Marbled Godwit
    13 Ruddy Turnstone
    13 Black Turnstone
    13 Surfbird
    02 Red Knot
    13 Sanderling
    02 Semipalmated Sandpiper
    13 Western Sandpiper
    13 Least Sandpiper
    03 Baird's Sandpiper
    13 Dunlin
    01 Ruff
    01 Stilt Sandpiper
    10 Short-billed Dowitcher
    13 Long-billed Dowitcher
    08 Wilson's Snipe
    10 Wilson's Phalarope
    13 Red-necked Phalarope
    01 Red Phalarope
    01 Sabine's Gull
    13 Bonaparte's Gull
    01 Laughing Gull
    06 Franklin's Gull
    13 Heermann's Gull
    02 Mew Gull
    13 Ring-billed Gull
    13 Western Gull
    13 California Gull
    12 Herring Gull
    02 Thayer's Gull
    13 Glaucous-winged Gull
    01 Glaucous Gull
    12 Least Tern
    13 Caspian Tern
    05 Black Tern
    01 Common Tern
    13 Forster's Tern
    13 Royal Tern
    13 Elegant Tern
    13 Black Skimmer
    07 Pomarine Jaeger
    07 Parasitic Jaeger
    04 Common Murre
    02 Scripps' Murrelet
    02 Cassin's Auklet
    03 Rhinoceros Auklet
    13 Rock Pigeon
    13 Band-tailed Pigeon
    12 Eurasian Collared-Dove
    13 Spotted Dove
    02 White-winged Dove
    13 Mourning Dove
    09 Inca Dove
    11 Common Ground-Dove
    13 Greater Roadrunner
    13 Barn Owl
    08 Flammulated Owl
    13 Western Screech-Owl
    13 Great Horned Owl
    12 Northern Pygmy-Owl
    13 Burrowing Owl
    13 Spotted Owl
    04 Long-eared Owl
    11 Northern Saw-whet Owl
    13 Lesser Nighthawk
    13 Common Poorwill
    13 Vaux's Swift
    13 White-throated Swift
    13 Black-chinned Hummingbird
    13 Anna's Hummingbird
    13 Costa's Hummingbird
    13 Rufous Hummingbird
    13 Allen's Hummingbird
    09 Calliope Hummingbird
    13 Belted Kingfisher
    10 Lewis's Woodpecker
    13 Acorn Woodpecker
    11 Williamson's Sapsucker
    13 Red-breasted Sapsucker
    01 Red-naped Sapsucker
    11 Ladder-backed Woodpecker
    13 Nuttall's Woodpecker
    13 Downy Woodpecker
    13 Hairy Woodpecker
    13 White-headed Woodpecker
    13 Northern Flicker
    13 American Kestrel
    10 Merlin
    13 Peregrine Falcon
    11 Prairie Falcon
    01 Crested Caracara
    13 Red-crowned Parrot
    13 Olive-sided Flycatcher
    13 Western Wood-Pewee
    13 Hammond's Flycatcher
    13 Gray Flycatcher
    13 Dusky Flycatcher
    13 Pacific-slope Flycatcher
    13 Black Phoebe
    13 Say's Phoebe
    04 Vermilion Flycatcher
    03 Dusky-capped Flycatcher
    13 Ash-throated Flycatcher
    04 Tropical Kingbird
    13 Cassin's Kingbird
    02 Thick-billed Kingbird
    13 Western Kingbird
    13 Loggerhead Shrike
    13 Bell's Vireo
    07 Plumbeous Vireo
    13 Cassin's Vireo
    13 Hutton's Vireo
    13 Warbling Vireo
    13 Steller's Jay
    13 Western Scrub-Jay
    12 Clark's Nutcracker
    13 American Crow
    13 Common Raven
    13 Horned Lark
    13 Northern Rough-winged Swallow
    05 Purple Martin
    13 Tree Swallow
    13 Violet-green Swallow
    11 Bank Swallow
    13 Barn Swallow
    13 Cliff Swallow
    13 Mountain Chickadee
    13 Oak Titmouse
    12 Verdin
    13 Bushtit
    13 Red-breasted Nuthatch
    13 White-breasted Nuthatch
    13 Pygmy Nuthatch
    13 Brown Creeper
    13 Rock Wren
    13 Canyon Wren
    13 House Wren
    13 Marsh Wren
    13 Bewick's Wren
    13 Cactus Wren
    13 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
    13 California Gnatcatcher
    09 American Dipper
    04 Golden-crowned Kinglet
    13 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
    13 Wrentit
    13 Western Bluebird
    01 Mountain Bluebird
    10 Townsend's Solitaire
    13 Swainson's Thrush
    13 Hermit Thrush
    13 American Robin
    01 Varied Thrush
    13 Northern Mockingbird
    13 California Thrasher
    09 Le Conte's Thrasher
    13 European Starling
    01 Red-throated Pipit
    13 American Pipit
    13 Cedar Waxwing
    13 Phainopepla
    01 Northern Waterthrush
    05 Black-and-white Warbler
    01 Tennessee Warbler
    13 Orange-crowned Warbler
    13 Nashville Warbler
    13 MacGillivray's Warbler
    13 Common Yellowthroat
    01 Hooded Warbler
    02 American Redstart
    01 Northern Parula
    13 Yellow Warbler
    01 Chestnut-sided Warbler
    07 Palm Warbler
    13 Yellow-rumped Warbler
    13 Black-throated Gray Warbler
    13 Townsend's Warbler
    13 Hermit Warbler
    13 Wilson's Warbler
    01 Painted Redstart
    13 Yellow-breasted Chat
    13 Green-tailed Towhee
    13 Spotted Towhee
    13 Rufous-crowned Sparrow
    13 California Towhee
    13 Chipping Sparrow
    02 Clay-colored Sparrow
    11 Brewer's Sparrow
    01 Field Sparrow
    13 Black-chinned Sparrow
    01 Vesper Sparrow
    12 Lark Sparrow
    13 Black-throated Sparrow
    13 Bell's Sparrow
    13 Savannah Sparrow
    04 Grasshopper Sparrow
    13 Fox Sparrow
    13 Song Sparrow
    12 Lincoln's Sparrow
    01 Swamp Sparrow
    09 White-throated Sparrow
    02 Harris' Sparrow
    13 White-crowned Sparrow
    13 Golden-crowned Sparrow
    13 Dark-eyed Junco
    06 Summer Tanager
    13 Western Tanager
    13 Black-headed Grosbeak
    13 Blue Grosbeak
    01 Indigo Bunting
    13 Lazuli Bunting
    13 Red-winged Blackbird
    13 Tricolored Blackbird
    13 Western Meadowlark
    13 Yellow-headed Blackbird
    13 Brewer's Blackbird
    13 Great-tailed Grackle
    13 Brown-headed Cowbird
    03 Orchard Oriole
    13 Hooded Oriole
    13 Bullock's Oriole
    01 Baltimore Oriole
    13 Scott's Oriole
    13 Purple Finch
    13 Cassin's Finch
    13 House Finch
    10 Red Crossbill
    12 Pine Siskin
    13 Lesser Goldfinch
    13 Lawrence's Goldfinch
    13 American Goldfinch
    01 Evening Grosbeak
    13 House Sparrow
    03 Nutmeg Mannikin 2014 was the first year we could count it
    
    Total: 332 species
    
    Removed: black swift and willow flycatcher because we think those reports were in error.
    
    Added in 2016:
    Neotropic Cormorant
    Ridgeway's Rail
    Bald Eagle
    Red-throated Pipit
    Varied Thrush
    
    Please start thinking of where you might be able to contribute, and we look forward to hearing from you this coming weekend!
    
    Best wishes,
    
    Lance Benner and Wanda Dameron
    
    Lance Benner
    Altadena, CA
  20. -back to top-
  21. Re: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River LINK
    DATE: Mar 9, 2017 @ 4:13pm, 12 month(s) ago
    It's not an illusion. It's been well- documented that for a brief period in the breeding season that the legs and areas of the foot in Western gulls can turn yellowish, but that there is also some pinkish in the legs, usually a narrow area on the rear of the tarsi, as well as some areas of pink in the webs of the foot.
    
    Stan Walens
    San Diego
  22. -back to top-
  23. Re: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River LINK
    DATE: Mar 9, 2017 @ 2:57pm, 12 month(s) ago
    I put some photos up on the ebird checklist just now. I did notice the funny looking optical illusion with the reflections on pink legs,but this guy's legs were not in doubt.
    
    http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35073434
    
    From: "Thomas Miko thomas_miko@... [LACoBirds]"
    To: John Garrett ; LACoBirds
    Sent: Thursday, March 9, 2017 2:41 PM
    Subject: RE: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River
    
    
    Not here. Lots of Western Gulls, some Herrings, Ring billed. Californias, Glaucous winged, one Thayer's.
    The strong sunlight creates an optical illusion that the adult Western Gulls' legs are both pink and yellow, at the same time.
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    Claremont CA 91711
    
    http://www.tgmiko.com
    
    Personal cell 909.241.3300
    Work cell 213.471.6001
    Office 213.351.7382
    Home 909.445.1456
    
    "The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'."
    
    -------- Original message --------
    
    From: "Thomas Miko thomas_miko@... [LACoBirds]"
    
    Date: 3/9/17 12:41 PM (GMT-08:00)
    
    To: John Garrett , LACoBirds
    
    Subject: RE: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River
    
    
    Is it loafing there, or is it likely to take off, any moment
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    Claremont CA 91711
    
    http://www.tgmiko.com
    
    Personal cell 909.241.3300
    Work cell 213.471.6001
    Office 213.351.7382
    Home 909.445.1456
    
    "The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'."
    
    -------- Original message --------
    
    From: "John Garrett curvirostra9@... [LACoBirds]"
    
    Date: 3/9/17 11:25 AM (GMT-08:00)
    
    To: LACoBirds
    
    Subject: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River
    
     Birders,
    
    9 March
    
    The() Yellow-footed Gull is currently on the L.A. River between Atlantic Blvd and Alondra Blvd, closer to Atlantic. I think the easiest parking/access is probably near Alondra, east of the river.
    
    John Garrett
    Pasadena
  24. -back to top-
  25. RE: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River LINK
    DATE: Mar 9, 2017 @ 2:41pm, 12 month(s) ago
    Not here. Lots of Western Gulls, some Herrings, Ring billed. Californias, Glaucous winged, one Thayer's.
    The strong sunlight creates an optical illusion that the adult Western Gulls' legs are both pink and yellow, at the same time.
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    Claremont CA 91711
    
    http://www.tgmiko.com
    
    Personal cell 909.241.3300
    Work cell 213.471.6001
    Office 213.351.7382
    Home 909.445.1456
    
    "The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'."
    
    -------- Original message --------
    
    From: "Thomas Miko thomas_miko@... [LACoBirds]"
    
    Date: 3/9/17 12:41 PM (GMT-08:00)
    
    To: John Garrett , LACoBirds
    
    Subject: RE: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River
    
     Is it loafing there, or is it likely to take off, any moment
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    Claremont CA 91711
    
    http://www.tgmiko.com
    
    Personal cell 909.241.3300
    Work cell 213.471.6001
    Office 213.351.7382
    Home 909.445.1456
    
    "The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'."
    
    -------- Original message --------
    
    From: "John Garrett curvirostra9@... [LACoBirds]"
    
    Date: 3/9/17 11:25 AM (GMT-08:00)
    
    To: LACoBirds
    
    Subject: [LACoBirds] Yellow-footed Gull, LA River
    
     Birders,
    
    9 March
    
    The() Yellow-footed Gull is currently on the L.A. River between Atlantic Blvd and Alondra Blvd, closer to Atlantic. I think the easiest parking/access is probably near Alondra, east of the river.
    
    John Garrett
    Pasadena
  26. -back to top-
  27. Rio Hondo Common Goldeneye LINK
    DATE: Mar 6, 2017 @ 2:54pm, 12 month(s) ago
    Ponds at the west end of Mines. Very very very uncooperative immature male. Spends more time under the surface than above, breathing. In a flock of several hundred California Gulls, 3 or more 1st winter Thayer's Gulls, one suspiciously pale-winged Thayer's
    (photos), maybe 25 Western Gulls, maybe 8 Herrings, including a weird 3rd winter probably a Herring that looks like the world's biggest California Gull.
    At noon over my house there were one Red-shouldered Hawk,one Red-tailed Hawk, and a karge Buteo with large, rectangular wings, rufous underwing coverts, a well-defined black border around the wing edges, and a pale, non- rufous tail.
    Then it flew away.
    
    Thomas Geza Miko
    653 S. Indian Hill Blvd.,#C
    Claremont CA 91711
    
    http://www.tgmiko.com
    
    Personal cell 909.241.3300
    Work cell 213.471.6001
    Office 213.351.7382
    Home 909.445.1456
    
    "The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'."
  28. -back to top-
  29. Malibu today LINK
    DATE: Feb 15, 2017 @ 4:16pm, 1 year(s) ago
    The main focus at Malibu today were the gulls present. Again, the majority were California Gulls. There were also many Western Gulls mixed in, Several Ring-billed Gulls were present, but only 3 Heermann's Gulls (all adults). Sounds like most have already departed for breeding grounds in Mexico.
    
    There was one adult winter Caspian Tern. The only Royal Tern found was an adult in full breeding plumage (full black crown). It seems early for this plumage to be seen.
    A Sora Rail was heard at Legacy Park which had a "lake" of water in its basin, but not much waterfowl or heron action nor passerines there. .
    
    Birdingly.
    
    Irwin Woldman
    Studio City
  30. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.30 - 01/05/16 - Revamped cloud logic, optimized database queries, linked to eBird rarities.
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'.